Inhalants to heroin: a prospective analysis from adolescence to adulthood

Eric O. Johnson, Christian G. Schütz, James C. Anthony, Margaret Ensminger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent cross-sectional studies have indicated that inhalant use might be a vulnerability marker for the development of heroin use. This study is the first prospective investigation of the hypothesized association between early inhalant use and later heroin use. Analyses were conducted using longitudinal data from a community sample of Woodlawn (an all African American community on the South side of Chicago). Six-hundred subjects participated in both the adolescent and the adult assessments (approximately ages 16 and 32, respectively). Youths with a history of inhalant use by age 16 were over nine times more likely to begin heroin use by age 32, even when other plausible risk factors for the development of heroin use were held constant (RR = 9.3; 95% C.I. = 1.3-51.3). These findings add to and are consistent with prior cross-sectional evidence from data based on treatment samples and national survey data. The results from this longitudinal assessment support the idea that youthful inhalant use should be regarded as a vulnerability marker for the development of more serious drug use involvement in the form of heroin use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-164
Number of pages6
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Heroin
adulthood
adolescence
vulnerability
cross-sectional study
community
drug use
adolescent
African Americans
history
Cross-Sectional Studies
evidence
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Epidemiology
  • Heroin
  • Inhalants
  • Longitudinal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology
  • Toxicology
  • Medicine(all)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Inhalants to heroin : a prospective analysis from adolescence to adulthood. / Johnson, Eric O.; Schütz, Christian G.; Anthony, James C.; Ensminger, Margaret.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 40, No. 2, 1995, p. 159-164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johnson, Eric O. ; Schütz, Christian G. ; Anthony, James C. ; Ensminger, Margaret. / Inhalants to heroin : a prospective analysis from adolescence to adulthood. In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 1995 ; Vol. 40, No. 2. pp. 159-164.
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