Infrequent transmission of monovalent human rotavirus vaccine virus to household contacts of vaccinated infants in Malawi

Aisleen Bennett, Louisa Pollock, Khuzwayo C. Jere, Virginia E. Pitzer, Benjamin Lopman, Umesh Parashar, Dean Everett, Robert S. Heyderman, Naor Bar-Zeev, Nigel A. Cunliffe, Miren Iturriza-Gomara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Horizontal transmission of rotavirus vaccine virus may contribute to indirect effects of rotavirus vaccine, but data are lacking from low-income countries. Serial stool samples were obtained from Malawian infants who received 2 doses of monovalent human rotavirus vaccine (RV1) (days 4, 6, 8, and 10 after vaccination) and from their household contacts (8-10 days after vaccine). RV1 vaccine virus in stool was detected using semi-quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. RV1 fecal shedding was detected in 41 of 60 vaccinated infants (68%) and in 2 of 147 household contacts (1.4%). Horizontal transmission of vaccine virus within households is unlikely to make a major contribution to RV1 indirect effects in Malawi.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1730-1734
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume219
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2019

Keywords

  • Indirect effects
  • Malawi
  • Rotavirus
  • Transmission
  • Vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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