Informed and patient-centered decision-making in the primary care visits of African Americans with depression

Anika L. Hines, Debra Roter, Bri K. Ghods Dinoso, Kathryn A. Carson, Gail L. Daumit, Lisa A. Cooper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: We examined the prevalence and extent of informed decision-making (IDM) and patient-centered decision-making (PCDM) in primary care visits of African Americans with depression. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of audiotaped clinical encounters and post-visit surveys of 76 patients and their clinicians. We used RIAS to characterize patient-centeredness of visit dialogue. IDM entailed discussion of 3 components: the nature of the decision, alternatives, and pros/cons. PCDM entailed discussion of: lifestyle/coping strategies, knowledge/beliefs, or treatment concerns. We examined the association of IDM and PCDM with visit duration, overall patient-centeredness, and patient/clinician interpersonal ratings. Results: Approximately one-quarter of medication and counseling decisions included essential IDM elements and 40% included at least one PCDM element. In high patient-centered visits, IDM was associated with patients feeling respected in counseling and liking clinicians in medication decisions. IDM was not related to clinician ratings. In low patient-centered visits, PCDM in counseling decisions was positively associated with patients feeling respected and clinicians respecting patients. Conclusions: The associations between IDM and PCDM with interpersonal ratings was moderated by overall patient-centeredness of the visit, which may be indicative of broader cross-cultural communication issues. Practice implications: Strengthening partnerships between depressed African Americans and their clinicians may improve patient-engaged decision-making.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-240
Number of pages8
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume101
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2018

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Depression
  • Informed decision-making
  • Patient-centeredness
  • Primary care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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