Informal social support and depression among african american men who have sex with men

Cui Yang, Carl A Latkin, Karin E Tobin, Jocelyn Patterson, Pilgrim Spikes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Men who have sex with men (MSM) experience greater mental health problems as compared with heterosexual populations. Informal social support plays a critical role in emotional well-being. The primary goal of this article is to examine the relationship between depressive symptoms and received social support from family, friends, and sex partners within the social network from a sample of 188 African American MSM in Baltimore, Maryland. We found that receiving emotional support from a family member or a sex partner was associated with reduced odds of having depressive symptoms. Receiving financial support from a family member or a friend was associated with increased odds of having depressive symptoms. The results suggest the importance of emotional support provided by family and sex partner in mental health and the potential value of training African American MSM in skills to enhance the quality of the relationships.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)435-445
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Community Psychology
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2013

Fingerprint

Social Support
African Americans
Depression
Mental Health
Financial Support
Baltimore
Heterosexuality
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Informal social support and depression among african american men who have sex with men. / Yang, Cui; Latkin, Carl A; Tobin, Karin E; Patterson, Jocelyn; Spikes, Pilgrim.

In: Journal of Community Psychology, Vol. 41, No. 4, 05.2013, p. 435-445.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{0466e71cffb84545856380247dbc00db,
title = "Informal social support and depression among african american men who have sex with men",
abstract = "Men who have sex with men (MSM) experience greater mental health problems as compared with heterosexual populations. Informal social support plays a critical role in emotional well-being. The primary goal of this article is to examine the relationship between depressive symptoms and received social support from family, friends, and sex partners within the social network from a sample of 188 African American MSM in Baltimore, Maryland. We found that receiving emotional support from a family member or a sex partner was associated with reduced odds of having depressive symptoms. Receiving financial support from a family member or a friend was associated with increased odds of having depressive symptoms. The results suggest the importance of emotional support provided by family and sex partner in mental health and the potential value of training African American MSM in skills to enhance the quality of the relationships.",
author = "Cui Yang and Latkin, {Carl A} and Tobin, {Karin E} and Jocelyn Patterson and Pilgrim Spikes",
year = "2013",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1002/jcop.21548",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "41",
pages = "435--445",
journal = "Journal of Community Psychology",
issn = "0090-4392",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Informal social support and depression among african american men who have sex with men

AU - Yang, Cui

AU - Latkin, Carl A

AU - Tobin, Karin E

AU - Patterson, Jocelyn

AU - Spikes, Pilgrim

PY - 2013/5

Y1 - 2013/5

N2 - Men who have sex with men (MSM) experience greater mental health problems as compared with heterosexual populations. Informal social support plays a critical role in emotional well-being. The primary goal of this article is to examine the relationship between depressive symptoms and received social support from family, friends, and sex partners within the social network from a sample of 188 African American MSM in Baltimore, Maryland. We found that receiving emotional support from a family member or a sex partner was associated with reduced odds of having depressive symptoms. Receiving financial support from a family member or a friend was associated with increased odds of having depressive symptoms. The results suggest the importance of emotional support provided by family and sex partner in mental health and the potential value of training African American MSM in skills to enhance the quality of the relationships.

AB - Men who have sex with men (MSM) experience greater mental health problems as compared with heterosexual populations. Informal social support plays a critical role in emotional well-being. The primary goal of this article is to examine the relationship between depressive symptoms and received social support from family, friends, and sex partners within the social network from a sample of 188 African American MSM in Baltimore, Maryland. We found that receiving emotional support from a family member or a sex partner was associated with reduced odds of having depressive symptoms. Receiving financial support from a family member or a friend was associated with increased odds of having depressive symptoms. The results suggest the importance of emotional support provided by family and sex partner in mental health and the potential value of training African American MSM in skills to enhance the quality of the relationships.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84875529120&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84875529120&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/jcop.21548

DO - 10.1002/jcop.21548

M3 - Article

C2 - 23935226

AN - SCOPUS:84875529120

VL - 41

SP - 435

EP - 445

JO - Journal of Community Psychology

JF - Journal of Community Psychology

SN - 0090-4392

IS - 4

ER -