Influenza vaccination by race among disabled community dwelling older women

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Disabled older adults have been shown to be at risk for underutilization of some preventive services relative to able-bodied individuals. The Women's Health and Aging Study surveyed female Medicare enrollees in Baltimore, Maryland, who were among the most disabled community-dwelling women at the start of the study. Longitudinal survey data from the study were used to test for the existence or emergence of racial variation in influenza vaccination rates, for which racial variation has been shown in the general population. The primary analysis, using data on the same women before and after Medicare flu shot coverage began, suggested that influenza vaccination rates increased after Medicare coverage began and that there was no difference by race. A secondary analysis using data on women who were interviewed only after Medicare flu shot coverage began showed some racial variation, although the difference may have been larger prior to coverage. The utilization rate did not approach the Healthy People 2010 target.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)220-236
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Volume15
Issue number2
StatePublished - May 2004

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Independent Living
vaccination
Medicare
Human Influenza
contagious disease
Vaccination
coverage
community
Healthy People Programs
Baltimore
secondary analysis
Women's Health
Longitudinal Studies
data analysis
utilization
health
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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title = "Influenza vaccination by race among disabled community dwelling older women",
abstract = "Disabled older adults have been shown to be at risk for underutilization of some preventive services relative to able-bodied individuals. The Women's Health and Aging Study surveyed female Medicare enrollees in Baltimore, Maryland, who were among the most disabled community-dwelling women at the start of the study. Longitudinal survey data from the study were used to test for the existence or emergence of racial variation in influenza vaccination rates, for which racial variation has been shown in the general population. The primary analysis, using data on the same women before and after Medicare flu shot coverage began, suggested that influenza vaccination rates increased after Medicare coverage began and that there was no difference by race. A secondary analysis using data on women who were interviewed only after Medicare flu shot coverage began showed some racial variation, although the difference may have been larger prior to coverage. The utilization rate did not approach the Healthy People 2010 target.",
author = "Kevin Frick and Scanlon, {Dennis P.} and {Bandeen Roche}, {Karen J} and Kasper, {Judith D.} and Simonsick, {Eleanor Marie} and Sullivan, {Erin M.}",
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