Influences on tobacco use among urban Hispanic young adults in Baltimore: findings from a qualitative study.

Jennifer D. McCleary-Sills, Andrea Villanti, Evelyn Rosario, Lee Bone, Frances Stillman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Among Hispanics, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death for men and the second leading cause of cancer death for women in the United States. Despite recent growth in Baltimore City's Hispanic population, few data exist on tobacco use behaviors in this group. The present research sought to explore the social and environmental influences and norms that encourage or discourage tobacco use among Hispanic young adults in Baltimore. In collaboration with several community stakeholders, we conducted focus groups with Hispanic young adults 18 to 24 years old. Participants were recruited from a community-based service organization and invited to take part in one of four focus groups segregated by gender. A total of 13 young men and 11 young women participated. Data from these focus groups indicate that cultural identity and gender norms leverage substantial influence in young adults' decision about whether, where, and with whom to smoke. The data also suggest multiple social and familial influences on their smoking and nonsmoking behaviors. Participants identified smoking practices and clear brand preferences that they feel distinguish Hispanics from other racial and ethnic groups. Despite acknowledging the high price of cigarettes, cost was not mentioned as a factor influential in their smoking decisions. These results provide essential guidance for the development of appropriate tobacco prevention and cessation intervention strategies and policy recommendations to eliminate tobacco use among Hispanic young adults in Baltimore.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)289-297
Number of pages9
JournalProgress in community health partnerships : research, education, and action
Volume4
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

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