Influence of sex hormones, HIV status, and concomitant sexually transmitted infection on cervicovaginal inflammation

Khalil G. Ghanem, Nina Shah, Robert S. Klein, Kenneth H. Mayer, Jack D. Sobel, D. L. Warren, Denise J. Jamieson, Ann C. Duerr, Anne M. Rompalo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The impact of demographic characteristics, phase of the menstrual cycle, use of hormonal contraceptives, and concomitant lower genital-tract infections on cervicovaginal inflammatory cells was assessed in 967 women, 654 of whom were infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) fluid was evaluated for total white blood cell (WBC), polymorphonuclear leukocyte, and monocyte counts. HIV-1 infection was not associated with statistically significant differences in numbers of inflammatory cells in CVL fluid except in 1 group-HIV-1-infected women with Chlamydia trachomatis infection had a 0.43 log10 higher WBC count than their HIV-uninfected, chlamydia-positive counterparts (P = .04). Younger age and use of progesterone-based hormonal contraceptives were independently associated with increased numbers of inflammatory cells in CVL fluid. A 0.15-0.2 log 10 increase in inflammatory cells was seen in black versus white and Hispanic women after adjustment for known potential confounders. Progesterone-based contraceptives, younger age, and race have an independent effect on cervicovaginal inflammatory cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)358-366
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume191
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Influence of sex hormones, HIV status, and concomitant sexually transmitted infection on cervicovaginal inflammation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this