Influence of home and school environments on specific dietary behaviors among postpartum, high-risk teens, 27 states, 2007-2009

Megan A. Clarke, Debra L. Haire-Joshu, Cynthia D. Schwarz, Rachel G. Tabak, Corinne E. Joshu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: The objective of this study was to determine whether perceptions of the home and school food environments are related to food and beverage intakes of postpartum teens. Methods: Our study was a baseline, cross-sectional analysis of 853 postpartum teens enrolled in a weight-loss intervention study across 27 states from 2007 through 2009. Eight-item scales assessed perceived accessibility and availability of foods and beverages in school and home environments. Associations between environments and intakes were assessed by using χ2 and using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations (GEE), respectively. Results: Overall, 52% of teens perceived their school food environment as positive, and 68% of teens perceived their home food environment as positive. A positive school environment was independently associated with fruit consumption and 100% fruit juice consumption. A positive home environment was independently associated with fruit, vegetable, and water consumption and infrequent consumption of soda and chips (χ2 P < .05). Having only a positive school environment was associated with fruit consumption (GEE odds ratio [OR], 3.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-6.5), and having only a positive home environment was associated with fruit (GEE OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.6-5.6), vegetable (GEE OR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.5-6.2), and water (GEE OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.7-4.0) consumption and infrequent consumption of soda (GEE OR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3-0.7). Results for positive home and school environments were similar to those for positive home only. Conclusion: Home and school environments are related to dietary behaviors among postpartum teens, with a positive home environment more strongly associated with healthful behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number140437
JournalPreventing Chronic Disease
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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