Inflammation and prostate cancer

A focus on infections

Siobhan Sutcliffe, Elizabeth A Platz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Despite accumulating evidence that inflammation may affect the development of prostate cancer, responsible causes of intraprostatic inflammation remain elusive. This review presents epidemiologic literature on infections, particularly sexually transmitted and other ascending urogenital infections, as possible causes of intraprostatic inflammation and/or prostate cancer. Study results are interpreted in light of the inflammatory and carcinogenic potential of each infectious agent, as well as the design, analysis, and historical and cultural context of each epidemiologic study. Such findings motivate additional investigation of traditionally explored organisms, such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and more recently explored organisms, such as Propionibacterium acnes, with careful consideration of their biology and epidemiology, as well as the design and analysis of epidemiologic studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)243-249
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Urology Reports
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Prostatic Neoplasms
Inflammation
Epidemiologic Studies
Infection
Propionibacterium acnes
Neisseria gonorrhoeae
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Epidemiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Inflammation and prostate cancer : A focus on infections. / Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Platz, Elizabeth A.

In: Current Urology Reports, Vol. 9, No. 3, 05.2008, p. 243-249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c238a0058d4a47d5adea42ba0fc54fe5,
title = "Inflammation and prostate cancer: A focus on infections",
abstract = "Despite accumulating evidence that inflammation may affect the development of prostate cancer, responsible causes of intraprostatic inflammation remain elusive. This review presents epidemiologic literature on infections, particularly sexually transmitted and other ascending urogenital infections, as possible causes of intraprostatic inflammation and/or prostate cancer. Study results are interpreted in light of the inflammatory and carcinogenic potential of each infectious agent, as well as the design, analysis, and historical and cultural context of each epidemiologic study. Such findings motivate additional investigation of traditionally explored organisms, such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and more recently explored organisms, such as Propionibacterium acnes, with careful consideration of their biology and epidemiology, as well as the design and analysis of epidemiologic studies.",
author = "Siobhan Sutcliffe and Platz, {Elizabeth A}",
year = "2008",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1007/s11934-008-0042-z",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
pages = "243--249",
journal = "Current Urology Reports",
issn = "1527-2737",
publisher = "Current Science, Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Inflammation and prostate cancer

T2 - A focus on infections

AU - Sutcliffe, Siobhan

AU - Platz, Elizabeth A

PY - 2008/5

Y1 - 2008/5

N2 - Despite accumulating evidence that inflammation may affect the development of prostate cancer, responsible causes of intraprostatic inflammation remain elusive. This review presents epidemiologic literature on infections, particularly sexually transmitted and other ascending urogenital infections, as possible causes of intraprostatic inflammation and/or prostate cancer. Study results are interpreted in light of the inflammatory and carcinogenic potential of each infectious agent, as well as the design, analysis, and historical and cultural context of each epidemiologic study. Such findings motivate additional investigation of traditionally explored organisms, such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and more recently explored organisms, such as Propionibacterium acnes, with careful consideration of their biology and epidemiology, as well as the design and analysis of epidemiologic studies.

AB - Despite accumulating evidence that inflammation may affect the development of prostate cancer, responsible causes of intraprostatic inflammation remain elusive. This review presents epidemiologic literature on infections, particularly sexually transmitted and other ascending urogenital infections, as possible causes of intraprostatic inflammation and/or prostate cancer. Study results are interpreted in light of the inflammatory and carcinogenic potential of each infectious agent, as well as the design, analysis, and historical and cultural context of each epidemiologic study. Such findings motivate additional investigation of traditionally explored organisms, such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and more recently explored organisms, such as Propionibacterium acnes, with careful consideration of their biology and epidemiology, as well as the design and analysis of epidemiologic studies.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=44449101570&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=44449101570&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11934-008-0042-z

DO - 10.1007/s11934-008-0042-z

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 243

EP - 249

JO - Current Urology Reports

JF - Current Urology Reports

SN - 1527-2737

IS - 3

ER -