Infections and immunizations in organ transplant recipients: A preventive approach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Infections after organ transplantation can be devastating in immunocompromised patients. Objective: To review strategies for preventing infections after transplantation. Summary: Immunization remains a cornerstone of preventive practice, but the suboptimal response to vaccinations in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy presents an ongoing challenge. More work is needed to determine which of the numerous strategies for preventing symptomatic cytomegalovirus infection is most effective and economical, and under which circumstances. Prevention of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia remains an important issue, especially in sulfa-intolerant patients. The relationship between different immunosuppressive programs and occurrence of infectious complications such as lymphoproliferative disease is just beginning to be understood. The toxicity of amphotericin B in this population has led to a search for more effective means of preventing and treating fungal infections. Finally, a new set of possible pathogens (such as the recently recognized human herpesvirus-6) is on the horizon. Conclusions: The best preventive approach encompasses awareness of epidemiologic risk, early detection of infection, appropriate prophylactic or preemptive therapy for specific infections, and close collaboration between the infectious-disease clinician and the transplant team.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)386-392
Number of pages7
JournalCleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
Volume61
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Immunization
Transplants
Immunosuppressive Agents
Infection
Human Herpesvirus 6
Pneumocystis Pneumonia
Mycoses
Cytomegalovirus Infections
Immunocompromised Host
Amphotericin B
Organ Transplantation
Communicable Diseases
Vaccination
Transplantation
Transplant Recipients
Therapeutics
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Infections and immunizations in organ transplant recipients : A preventive approach. / Avery, Robin.

In: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine, Vol. 61, No. 5, 1994, p. 386-392.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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