Infant Growth following Maternal Participation in a Gestational Weight Management Intervention

Emily F. Gregory, Matthew A. Goldshore, Janice L Henderson, Robert D. Weatherford, Nakiya N Showell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Obesity is widespread and treatment strategies have demonstrated limited success. Changes to obstetrical practice in response to obesity may support obesity prevention by influencing offspring growth trajectories. Methods: This retrospective cohort study examined growth among infants born to obese mothers who participated in Nutrition in Pregnancy (NIP), a prenatal nutrition intervention at one urban hospital. NIP participants had Medicaid insurance and BMIs of 30 kg/m2 or greater. We compared NIP infant growth to a historical control cohort, matched on maternal factors: age, race/ethnicity, prepregnancy BMI, parity, and history of prepregnancy hypertension or preterm birth. Results: Growth data were available for 61 NIP and 145 control infants. Most mothers were African American (94%). Mean maternal BMI was 39.9 kg/m2 (standard deviation [SD], 5.6) for NIP participants and 38.8 kg/m2 (SD, 6.0) for controls. Pregnancy outcomes, including preterm birth, gestational diabetes, and birth weight, did not differ between groups. NIP participants were more likely to attend a postpartum visit (69% vs. 52%; p value, 0.03). At 1 year, 17% of NIP infants and 15% of controls had weight-for-length (WFL) ≥95th percentile (p value, 0.66). Other markers of accelerated infant growth, including crossing WFL percentiles and peak infant BMI, did not differ between groups. Conclusions: There was no difference in growth between infants whose mothers participated in a prenatal nutrition intervention and those whose mothers did not. Existing prenatal programs for obese women may be inadequate to prevent pediatric obesity without pediatric collaboration to promote family-centered support beyond pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-225
Number of pages7
JournalChildhood Obesity
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

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Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Mothers
Weights and Measures
Growth
Obesity
Premature Birth
Gestational Diabetes
Pediatric Obesity
Urban Hospitals
Maternal Age
Medicaid
Pregnancy Outcome
Parity
Insurance
Birth Weight
African Americans
Postpartum Period
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Pediatrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Infant Growth following Maternal Participation in a Gestational Weight Management Intervention. / Gregory, Emily F.; Goldshore, Matthew A.; Henderson, Janice L; Weatherford, Robert D.; Showell, Nakiya N.

In: Childhood Obesity, Vol. 12, No. 3, 01.06.2016, p. 219-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gregory, Emily F. ; Goldshore, Matthew A. ; Henderson, Janice L ; Weatherford, Robert D. ; Showell, Nakiya N. / Infant Growth following Maternal Participation in a Gestational Weight Management Intervention. In: Childhood Obesity. 2016 ; Vol. 12, No. 3. pp. 219-225.
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