Induction and quantification of prefrontal cortical network plasticity using 5 Hz rTMS and fMRI

Christine Esslinger, Nadja Schüler, Carina Sauer, Dagmar Gass, Daniela Mier, Urs Braun, Elisabeth Ochs, Thomas G. Schulze, Marcella Rietschel, Peter Kirsch, Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Neuronal plasticity is crucial for flexible interaction with a changing environment and its disruption is thought to contribute to psychiatric diseases like schizophrenia. High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive tool to increase local excitability of neurons and induce short-time functional reorganization of cortical networks. While this has been shown for the motor system, little is known about the short-term plasticity of networks for executive cognition in humans. We examined 12 healthy control subjects in a crossover study with fMRI after real and sham 5 Hz rTMS to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). During scanning, subjects performed an n-back working memory (WM) task and a flanker task engaging cognitive control. Reaction times during the n-back task were significantly shorter after rTMS than after sham stimulation. RTMS compared with sham stimulation caused no activation changes at the stimulation site (right DLPFC) itself, but significantly increased connectivity within the WM network during n-back and reduced activation in the anterior cingulate cortex during the flanker task. Reduced reaction times after real stimulation support an excitatory effect of high-frequency rTMS. Our findings identified plastic changes in prefrontally connected networks downstream of the stimulation site as the substrate of this behavioral effect. Using a multimodal fMRI-rTMS approach, we could demonstrate changes in cortical plasticity in humans during executive cognition. In further studies this approach could be used to study pharmacological, genetic and disease-related alterations. Hum Brain Mapp 35:140-151, 2014.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)140-151
Number of pages12
JournalHuman Brain Mapping
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Prefrontal Cortex
Short-Term Memory
Cognition
Reaction Time
Inborn Genetic Diseases
Neuronal Plasticity
Gyrus Cinguli
Cross-Over Studies
Psychiatry
Schizophrenia
Healthy Volunteers
Pharmacology
Neurons
Brain

Keywords

  • Connectivity
  • FMRI
  • Interference control
  • Plasticity
  • Prefrontal cortex
  • RTMS
  • Working memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anatomy
  • Neurology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Esslinger, C., Schüler, N., Sauer, C., Gass, D., Mier, D., Braun, U., ... Meyer-Lindenberg, A. (2014). Induction and quantification of prefrontal cortical network plasticity using 5 Hz rTMS and fMRI. Human Brain Mapping, 35(1), 140-151. https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.22165

Induction and quantification of prefrontal cortical network plasticity using 5 Hz rTMS and fMRI. / Esslinger, Christine; Schüler, Nadja; Sauer, Carina; Gass, Dagmar; Mier, Daniela; Braun, Urs; Ochs, Elisabeth; Schulze, Thomas G.; Rietschel, Marcella; Kirsch, Peter; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas.

In: Human Brain Mapping, Vol. 35, No. 1, 01.2014, p. 140-151.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Esslinger, C, Schüler, N, Sauer, C, Gass, D, Mier, D, Braun, U, Ochs, E, Schulze, TG, Rietschel, M, Kirsch, P & Meyer-Lindenberg, A 2014, 'Induction and quantification of prefrontal cortical network plasticity using 5 Hz rTMS and fMRI', Human Brain Mapping, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 140-151. https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.22165
Esslinger, Christine ; Schüler, Nadja ; Sauer, Carina ; Gass, Dagmar ; Mier, Daniela ; Braun, Urs ; Ochs, Elisabeth ; Schulze, Thomas G. ; Rietschel, Marcella ; Kirsch, Peter ; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas. / Induction and quantification of prefrontal cortical network plasticity using 5 Hz rTMS and fMRI. In: Human Brain Mapping. 2014 ; Vol. 35, No. 1. pp. 140-151.
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