Indoor exposure to particulate matter and age at first acute lower respiratory infection in a low-income Urban community in Bangladesh

Emily S. Gurley, Henrik Salje, Nusrat Homaira, Pavani K. Ram, Rashidul Haque, William A. Petri, Joseph Bresee, William J. Moss, Stephen P. Luby, Patrick Breysse, Eduardo Azziz-Baumgartner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The timing of a child's first acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) is important, because the younger a child is when he or she experiences ALRI, the greater the risk of death. Indoor exposure to particulate matter less than or equal to 2.5 m in diameter (PM2.5) has been associated with increased frequency of ALRI, but little is known about how it may affect the timing of a child's first ALRI. In this study, we aimed to estimate the association between a child's age at first ALRI and indoor exposure to PM2.5 in a low-income community in Dhaka, Bangladesh. We followed 257 children from birth through age 2 years to record their age at first ALRI. Between May 2009 and April 2010, we also measured indoor concentrations of PM2.5 in children's homes. We used generalized gamma distribution models to estimate the relative age at first ALRI associated with the mean number of hours in which PM2.5 concentrations exceeded 100 g/m3. Each hour in which PM2.5 levels exceeded 100 g/m3 was independently associated with a 12% decrease (95% confidence interval: 2, 21; P = 0.021) in age at first ALRI. Interventions to reduce indoor exposure to PM2.5 could increase the ages at which children experience their first ALRI in this urban community.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)967-973
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of epidemiology
Volume179
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bangladesh
  • acute lower respiratory infection
  • child health
  • particulate matter
  • survival analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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