Indoor air pollution from secondhand tobacco smoke, solid fuels, and kerosene in homes with active tuberculosis disease in South Africa

Jessica L. Elf, Onyinyechi Eke, Modiehi Rakgokong, Ebrahim Variava, Yudesh Baliram, Katlego Motlhaoleng, Limakatso Lebina, Adrienne E. Shapiro, Patrick N. Breysse, Jonathan E. Golub, Neil Martinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: Secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS), use of solid fuels, and kerosene may play an important role in perpetuating the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic. The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence of household air pollution (HAP) from these sources in homes of someone with TB in a high HIV-prevalence setting. A convenience sample of homes and household members participating in an ongoing active case-finding study in Matlosana district townships surrounding Klerksdorp, South Africa were included. Results: We found a high prevalence of air pollution from SHS, solid fuels, and kerosene among individuals in homes with a case of prevalent active TB disease in Klerksdorp, South Africa. Adults in 40% of homes reported a daily smoker in the home, and 70% of homes had detectable air nicotine. In homes with a history of previous TB (prior to but not including the index case) as compared to those without previous TB, both SHS (83% vs. 65%, respectively) and solid/kerosene fuel use for more than 1 h/day (27% vs. 21%, respectively) were more prevalent. Larger studies are needed to estimate the risk of TB from these types of air pollution in HIV infected individuals and settings with high HIV prevalence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number591
JournalBMC Research Notes
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 13 2017

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • HIV
  • Kerosene
  • Secondhand smoke
  • Solid fuel smoke
  • Tobacco

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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