Indoor air pollution and asthma in children

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to review indoor air pollution factors that can modify asthma severity, particularly in inner-city environments. While there is a large literature linking ambient air pollution and asthma morbidity, less is known about the impact of indoor air pollution on asthma. Concentrating on the indoor environments is particularly important for children, since they can spend as much as 90% of their time indoors. This review focuses on studies conducted by the Johns Hopkins Center for Childhood Asthma in the Urban Environment as well as other relevant epidemiologic studies. Analysis of exposure outcome relationships in the published literature demonstrates the importance of evaluating indoor home environmental air pollution sources as risk factors for asthma morbidity. Important indoor air pollution determinants of asthma morbidity in urban environments include particulate matter (particularly the coarse fraction), nitrogen dioxide, and airborne mouse allergen exposure. Avoidance of harmful environmental exposures is a key component of national and international guideline recommendations for management of asthma. This literature suggests that modifying the indoor environment to reduce particulate matter, NO2, and mouse allergen maybe an important asthma management strategy. More research documenting effectiveness of interventions to reduce those exposures and improve asthma outcomes is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)102-106
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the American Thoracic Society
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010

Fingerprint

Indoor Air Pollution
Asthma
Particulate Matter
Air Pollution
Morbidity
Allergens
Nitrogen Dioxide
Environmental Pollution
Environmental Exposure
Epidemiologic Studies
Guidelines

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • Bronchial hyperreactivity
  • Particulate matter
  • Pediatric
  • Urban

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Indoor air pollution and asthma in children. / Breysse, Patrick N; Diette, Gregory B; Matsui, Elizabeth C.; Butz, Arlene Manns; Hansel, Nadia; McCormack, Meredith.

In: Proceedings of the American Thoracic Society, Vol. 7, No. 2, 01.05.2010, p. 102-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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