Individualized performance feedback to surgical residents improves appropriate venous thromboembolism prophylaxis prescription and reduces potentially preventable vte: A prospective cohort study

Brandyn D. Lau, George J. Arnaoutakis, Michael B. Streiff, Isaac W. Howley, Katherine E. Poruk, Robert Beaulieu, Trevor A. Ellison, Kyle J. Van Arendonk, Peggy S. Kraus, Deborah B. Hobson, Christine G. Holzmueller, James H. Black, Peter J. Pronovost, Elliott R. Haut

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the effect of providing personal clinical effectiveness performance feedback to general surgery residents regarding prescription of appropriate venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis. Background: Residents are frequently charged with prescribing medications for patients, including VTE prophylaxis, but rarely receive individual performance feedback regarding these practice habits. Methods: This prospective cohort study at the Johns Hopkins Hospital compared outcomes across 3 study periods: (1) baseline, (2) scorecard alone, and (3) scorecard plus coaching. All general surgery residents (n=49) and surgical patients (n=2420) for whom residents wrote admission orders during the first 9 months of the 2013-2014 academic year were included. Outcomes included the proportions of patients prescribed appropriate VTE prophylaxis, patients with preventable VTE, and residents prescribing appropriate VTE prophylaxis for every patient, and results from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education resident survey. Results: At baseline, 89.4% of patients were prescribed appropriate VTE prophylaxis and only 45% of residents prescribed appropriate prophylaxis for every patient. During the scorecard period, appropriate VTE prophylaxis prescription significantly increased to 95.4% (P<0.001). For the scorecard plus coaching period, significantly more residents prescribed appropriate prophylaxis for every patient (78% vs 45%, P=0.0017). Preventable VTE was eliminated in both intervention periods (0% vs 0.35%, P=0.046). After providing feedback, significantly more residents reported receiving data about practice habits on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education resident survey (87% vs 38%, P<0.001). Conclusions: Providing personal clinical effectiveness feedback including data and peer-to-peer coaching improves resident performance, and results in a significant reduction in harm for patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1181-1187
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of surgery
Volume264
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 28 2016

Keywords

  • Decision support
  • Quality
  • Resident education
  • Venous thromboembolism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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