Individual sociodemographic characteristics associated with hospitalization for pediatric ambulatory care sensitive conditions

Leiyu Shi, Ning Lu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined the association of individual sociodemographic characteristics with pediatric ambulatory care sensitive condition (ACSC) hospitalizations in American hospitals while controlling for selected hospital characteristics. Data came from the 1994 National Hospital Discharge Survey. Bivariate statistical comparisons were performed to test the differences between ACSC and non-ACSC hospitalization rates in patient demographic and hospital characteristics. Logistic regression was followed to examine the relative significance of patient and hospital characteristics associated with pediatric ACSC hospitalizations. Such individual sociodemographic characteristics as age, race, and insurance status were significant predictors of ACSC hospitalization. Younger children were more likely to have ACSC hospitalization than older ones. Black children were 1.653 times more likely than white children to be hospitalized for ACSC (confidence interval = 1.53-1.79). Those with Medicaid or no secondary insurance were more likely to be hospitalized for ACSC than those with private insurance or with secondary insurance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)373-384
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of health care for the poor and underserved
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2000

Keywords

  • Medicaid
  • Pediatric hospitalization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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