Individual factors influencing effective nonviolent behavior and fighting in peer situations: A qualitative study with urban African American adolescents

Albert D. Farrell, Elizabeth H. Erwin, Amie Bettencourt, Sally Mays, Monique Vulin-Reynolds, Terri Sullivan, Kevin W. Allison, Wendy Kliewer, Aleta Meyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This qualitative study examined individual-level factors that influence adolescents' responses to problem situations involving peers. Interviews were conducted with 106 middle school students (97% African American) from an urban school system. Participants described factors that would make it easier and those that would make it more difficult for adolescents to make specific responses to problem situations. Responses included effective nonviolent responses and fighting. Qualitative analysis identified 17 individual-level themes representing personal resources, beliefs and values, perceived consequences, and appraisal of the situation. The identification of factors that influence fighting and nonviolent behavior has important implications for efforts to reduce aggression and promote effective nonviolent responses to problem situations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)397-411
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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