Individual, Cultural and Structural Predictors of Vaccine Safety Confidence and Influenza Vaccination Among Hispanic Female Subgroups

Meghan Bridgid Moran, Joyee S. Chatterjee, Lauren B. Frank, Sheila T. Murphy, Nan Zhao, Nancy Chen, Sandra Ball-Rokeach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Rates of influenza vaccination among US Hispanics are lower than for non-Hispanic whites, yet little is known about factors affecting vaccination in this population. Additionally, although Hispanics are a diverse population with culturally distinct subgroups, they are often treated as a homogenous population. This study (1) examines how confidence in vaccine safety and influenza vaccine use vary by Hispanic subgroup and (2) identifies individual, cultural and structural correlates of these outcomes. This study analyzed survey data from 1565 Hispanic women who were recruited at clinic- and community-based sites in Los Angeles. Education, healthcare coverage, acculturation, fatalism, and religiosity were predictors of influenza vaccination behavior and predictors varied by subgroup. These findings provide guidance for how influenza vaccine promotion efforts can be developed for Hispanic subgroups. Confidence in the safety of a vaccine is a major predictor of flu vaccination and an important modifiable target for intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)790-800
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

Keywords

  • Hispanics
  • Immunizations
  • Influenza
  • Vaccine hesitancy
  • Vaccines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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