Individual and social factors associated with participation in treatment programs for drug users

V. Anna Gyarmathy, Carl A Latkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Since only about one third of people who are dependent on drugs are in treatment, there is a need to promote both treatment entry and retention. Previous research has described the role of individual and social characteristics in drug user treatment participation, but little is known about the interaction of individual and social factors. Injecting and noninjecting drug users (2002-2004; N = 581) were recruited, as part of Self-Help in Eliminating Life-Threatening Diseases (SHIELD) study, in Baltimore, MD, and were administered a structured questionnaire. The mean age of participants was 43.6 years, out of which 41% were female, 50% had high school education, and 16% self-reported being HIV infected. Logistic regression analyses of interaction terms revealed that compared to those with no plans to stop and no friends encouraging them to enter treatment those who planned to cease drug use or whose friends encouraged treatment were more likely to attend a 12-step program. Furthermore, compared to those with no problems with drug use and no friends encouraging them to enter treatment those with greater perceived drug problem severity or with friends encouraging treatment were more likely to attend methadone maintenance, as were those who did not receive free drugs from others. The influence of friends may have a crucial modifying effect by getting into treatment less addicted individuals who have higher chances of successful recovery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume43
Issue number12-13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2008

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Drug user treatment
  • Injecting and noninjecting drug users
  • Interaction
  • Relapse
  • Sustained treatment
  • Treatment entry
  • Treatment retention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this