Independence of movement preparation and movement initiation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Initiating a movement in response to a visual stimulus takes significantly longer than might be expected on the basis of neural transmission delays, but it is unclear why. In a visually guided reaching task, we forced human participants to move at lower-than-normal reaction times to test whether normal reaction times are strictly necessary for accurate movement. We found that participants were, in fact, capable of moving accurately ~80 ms earlier than their reaction times would suggest. Reaction times thus include a seemingly unnecessary delay that accounts for approximately one-third of their duration. Close examination of participants’ behavior in conventional reaction-time conditions revealed that they generated occasional, spontaneous errors in trials in which their reaction time was unusually short. The pattern of these errors could be well accounted for by a simple model in which the timing of movement initiation is independent of the timing of movement preparation. This independence provides an explanation for why reaction times are usually so sluggish: delaying the mean time of movement initiation relative to preparation reduces the risk that a movement will be initiated before it has been appropriately prepared. Our results suggest that preparation and initiation of movement are mechanistically independent and may have a distinct neural basis. The results also demonstrate that, even in strongly stimulus-driven tasks, presentation of a stimulus does not directly trigger a movement. Rather, the stimulus appears to trigger an internal decision whether to make a movement, reflecting a volitional rather than reactive mode of control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3007-3015
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume36
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 9 2016

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Reaction Time
Synaptic Transmission

Keywords

  • Movement initiation
  • Movement preparation
  • Reaching
  • Reaction time
  • Volitional movement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Independence of movement preparation and movement initiation. / Haith, Adrian; Pakpoor, Jina; Krakauer, John.

In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 36, No. 10, 09.03.2016, p. 3007-3015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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