Increasing incidence of metastatic prostate cancer in the United States (2004–2013)

A. B. Weiner, R. S. Matulewicz, S. E. Eggener, E. M. Schaeffer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background:Changes in prostate cancer screening practices in the United States have led to recent declines in overall incidence, but it is unknown whether relaxed screening has led to changes in the incidence of advanced and metastatic prostate cancer at diagnosis.Methods:We identified all men diagnosed with prostate cancer in the National Cancer Data Base (2004–2013) at 1089 different health-care facilities in the United States. Joinpoint regressions were used to model annual percentage changes (APCs) in the incidence of prostate cancer based on stage relative to that of 2004.Results:The annual incidence of metastatic prostate cancer increased from 2007 to 2013 (Joinpoint regression: APC: 7.1%, P<0.05) and in 2013 was 72% more than that of 2004. The incidence of low-risk prostate cancer decreased from years 2007 to 2013 (APC: −9.3%, P<0.05) to 37% less than that of 2004. The greatest increase in metastatic prostate cancer was seen in men aged 55–69 years (92% increase from 2004 to 2013).Conclusions:Beginning in 2007, the incidence of metastatic prostate cancer has increased especially among men in the age group thought most likely to benefit from definitive treatment for prostate cancer. These data highlight the continued need for nationwide refinements in prostate cancer screening and treatment.Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases advance online publication, 19 July 2016; doi:10.1038/pcan.2016.30.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalProstate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jul 19 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Prostatic Neoplasms
Incidence
Early Detection of Cancer
Prostatic Diseases
Health Facilities
Publications
Age Groups
Databases
Delivery of Health Care
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Urology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Increasing incidence of metastatic prostate cancer in the United States (2004–2013). / Weiner, A. B.; Matulewicz, R. S.; Eggener, S. E.; Schaeffer, E. M.

In: Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases, 19.07.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weiner, A. B. ; Matulewicz, R. S. ; Eggener, S. E. ; Schaeffer, E. M. / Increasing incidence of metastatic prostate cancer in the United States (2004–2013). In: Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases. 2016.
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abstract = "Background:Changes in prostate cancer screening practices in the United States have led to recent declines in overall incidence, but it is unknown whether relaxed screening has led to changes in the incidence of advanced and metastatic prostate cancer at diagnosis.Methods:We identified all men diagnosed with prostate cancer in the National Cancer Data Base (2004–2013) at 1089 different health-care facilities in the United States. Joinpoint regressions were used to model annual percentage changes (APCs) in the incidence of prostate cancer based on stage relative to that of 2004.Results:The annual incidence of metastatic prostate cancer increased from 2007 to 2013 (Joinpoint regression: APC: 7.1{\%}, P<0.05) and in 2013 was 72{\%} more than that of 2004. The incidence of low-risk prostate cancer decreased from years 2007 to 2013 (APC: −9.3{\%}, P<0.05) to 37{\%} less than that of 2004. The greatest increase in metastatic prostate cancer was seen in men aged 55–69 years (92{\%} increase from 2004 to 2013).Conclusions:Beginning in 2007, the incidence of metastatic prostate cancer has increased especially among men in the age group thought most likely to benefit from definitive treatment for prostate cancer. These data highlight the continued need for nationwide refinements in prostate cancer screening and treatment.Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases advance online publication, 19 July 2016; doi:10.1038/pcan.2016.30.",
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