INCREASED SKIN PIGMENT REDUCES THE CAPACITY OF SKIN TO SYNTHESISE VITAMIN D3

T. L. Clemens, S. L. Henderson, J. S. Adams, M. F. Holick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To determine the effect of increased skin pigment on the cutaneous production of vitamin D3, circulating vitamin D concentrations were determined in two lightly pigmented Caucasian and three heavily pigmented Negro volunteers after exposure to a single standard dose of ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Exposure of Caucasian subjects to 1 minimal erythemal dose of UVR greatly increased serum vitamin-D concentrations by up to 60-fold 24-48 h after exposure, whereas this dose did not significantly change serum vitamin-D concentrations in Negro subjects. Re-exposure of one Negro subject to a dose of UVR six times larger than the standard dose increased circulating vitamin D to concentrations similar to those recorded in Caucasian subjects after exposure to the lower dose. These results indicate that increased skin pigment can greatly reduce the UVR-mediated synthesis of vitamin D3.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)74-76
Number of pages3
JournalThe Lancet
Volume319
Issue number8263
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 9 1982
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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