Increased risk of invasive bacterial infections in African people with sickle-cell disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Meenakshi Ramakrishnan, Jennifer C. Moïsi, Keith P. Klugman, Jesus M Feris Iglesias, Lindsay Renee Grant, Mireille Mpoudi-Etame, Orin S. Levine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Children with sickle-cell disease are at great risk of serious infections and early mortality. Our Review investigates the association between sickle-cell disease and invasive bacterial disease among populations in Africa. We systematically searched published work extracted data on pneumonia, meningitis, and bacteraemia by sickle-cell disease status. Most studies identified lacked a control group and did not use best laboratory methods for culturing fastidious bacteria. Only seven case-control or case-cohort studies provided data on the association between invasive bacterial disease and sickle-cell disease status. For all-cause laboratory-confirmed invasive bacterial disease, the pooled odds of sickle-cell disease was 19-times greater among cases than controls. For disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, the pooled odds of sickle-cell disease was 36-times greater; and for Haemophilus influenzae type b disease it was 13-times greater.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)329-337
Number of pages9
JournalLancet Infectious Diseases
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010

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Sickle Cell Anemia
Bacterial Infections
Meta-Analysis
Haemophilus influenzae type b
Bacteremia
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Meningitis
Pneumonia
Cohort Studies
Bacteria
Control Groups
Mortality
Infection
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Ramakrishnan, M., Moïsi, J. C., Klugman, K. P., Iglesias, J. M. F., Grant, L. R., Mpoudi-Etame, M., & Levine, O. S. (2010). Increased risk of invasive bacterial infections in African people with sickle-cell disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Lancet Infectious Diseases, 10(5), 329-337. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(10)70055-4

Increased risk of invasive bacterial infections in African people with sickle-cell disease : A systematic review and meta-analysis. / Ramakrishnan, Meenakshi; Moïsi, Jennifer C.; Klugman, Keith P.; Iglesias, Jesus M Feris; Grant, Lindsay Renee; Mpoudi-Etame, Mireille; Levine, Orin S.

In: Lancet Infectious Diseases, Vol. 10, No. 5, 05.2010, p. 329-337.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ramakrishnan, M, Moïsi, JC, Klugman, KP, Iglesias, JMF, Grant, LR, Mpoudi-Etame, M & Levine, OS 2010, 'Increased risk of invasive bacterial infections in African people with sickle-cell disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Lancet Infectious Diseases, vol. 10, no. 5, pp. 329-337. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(10)70055-4
Ramakrishnan, Meenakshi ; Moïsi, Jennifer C. ; Klugman, Keith P. ; Iglesias, Jesus M Feris ; Grant, Lindsay Renee ; Mpoudi-Etame, Mireille ; Levine, Orin S. / Increased risk of invasive bacterial infections in African people with sickle-cell disease : A systematic review and meta-analysis. In: Lancet Infectious Diseases. 2010 ; Vol. 10, No. 5. pp. 329-337.
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