Increased risk of invasive bacterial infections in African people with sickle-cell disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Meenakshi Ramakrishnan, Jennifer C. Moïsi, Keith P. Klugman, Jesus M.Feris Iglesias, Lindsay R. Grant, Mireille Mpoudi-Etame, Orin S. Levine

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Children with sickle-cell disease are at great risk of serious infections and early mortality. Our Review investigates the association between sickle-cell disease and invasive bacterial disease among populations in Africa. We systematically searched published work extracted data on pneumonia, meningitis, and bacteraemia by sickle-cell disease status. Most studies identified lacked a control group and did not use best laboratory methods for culturing fastidious bacteria. Only seven case-control or case-cohort studies provided data on the association between invasive bacterial disease and sickle-cell disease status. For all-cause laboratory-confirmed invasive bacterial disease, the pooled odds of sickle-cell disease was 19-times greater among cases than controls. For disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, the pooled odds of sickle-cell disease was 36-times greater; and for Haemophilus influenzae type b disease it was 13-times greater.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)329-337
Number of pages9
JournalThe Lancet Infectious Diseases
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases

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