Increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant defenses in mucosa of inflammatory bowel disease

Lisa Lih-Brody, Saul R. Powell, Kevin P. Collier, Gautam M. Reddy, Renee Cerchia, Ellen Kahn, Gary S. Weissman, Seymour Katz, Robert A. Floyd, Matthew J. McKinley, Stanley E. Fisher, Gerard E. Mullin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation whose cellular components are capable of oxidative respiratory bursts that may result in tissue injury. Mucosal biopsies were analyzed for protein carbonyl content (POPs), DNA oxidation products [8-hydioxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)], reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs), trace metals (copper, zinc, and iron) and superoxide dismutase (Cu-Zn SOD). In Crohn's disease biopsies, there was an increase in ROIs, POPs, 8-OHdG, and iron, while decreased copper and Cu-Zn SOD activity were found in inflamed tissues compared to controls. For ulcerative colitis, there was an increase in ROIs, POPs, and iron in inflamed tissue compared to controls, while decreased zinc and copper were observed. An imbalance in the formation of reactive oxygen species and antioxidant micronutrients may be important in the pathogenesis and/or perpetuation of the tissue injury in IBD and may provide a rationale for therapeutic modulation with antioxidants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2078-2086
Number of pages9
JournalDigestive Diseases and Sciences
Volume41
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 13 1996
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Antioxidants
  • Inflammation
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Oxygen free radicals
  • Tissue injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Gastroenterology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant defenses in mucosa of inflammatory bowel disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this