Increased Gastrointestinal Permeability and Gut Inflammation in Children with Functional Abdominal Pain and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Robert J. Shulman, Michelle N. Eakin, Danita I. Czyzewski, Monica Jarrett, Ching Nan Ou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To determine gastrointestinal (GI) permeability and fecal calprotectin concentration in children 7 to 10 years of age with functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome (FAP/IBS) versus control subjects and ascertain potential relationships with pain symptoms and stooling. Study design: GI permeability and fecal calprotectin concentration were measured. Children kept a 2-week diary of pain episodes and stooling pattern. Results: Proximal GI permeability was greater in the FAP/IBS group (n = 93) compared with control subjects (n = 52) (0.59 ± 0.50 vs 0.36 ± 0.26, respectively; mean ± SD; P < .001) as was colonic permeability (1.01 ± 0.67 vs 0.81 ± 0.43, respectively; P < .05). Gastric and small intestinal permeability were similar. Fecal calprotectin concentration was greater in children with FAP/IBS compared with control children (65.5 ± 75.4 μg/g stool vs 43.2 ± 39.4, respectively; P < .01). Fecal calprotectin concentration correlated with pain interference with activities (P = .01, r2 = 0.36). There was no correlation between GI permeability and pain related symptoms. Neither permeability nor fecal calprotectin correlated with stool form. Conclusions: Children with FAP/IBS have evidence of increased GI permeability and low-grade GI inflammation, with the latter relating to the degree to which pain interferes with activities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)646-650
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume153
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2008
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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