Incidence of restless legs syndrome and its correlates

Pooja Budhiraja, Rohit Budhiraja, James L. Goodwin, Richard Allen, Anne B. Newman, Brian B. Koo, Stuart F. Quan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common sensorimotor disorder whose incidence is not known. The aim of the study was to determine the incidence and correlates of RLS in a population-based sample. Methods: We obtained data from the Tucson Cohort of the Sleep Heart Health Study, a prospective multicenter study. This cohort included 535 participants aged ≥ 40 years, who answered questions regarding RLS on the 2002 and 2006 sleep surveys. For this study, RLS was defi ned as the presence of all 4 International RLS Study Group criteria, with symptoms occurring ≥ 5 days/month and associated with at least moderate distress. Results: Mean age of the predominantly Caucasian (90.8%) participants on the 2002 survey was 59.8 ± 9.7 years; 52.2% were women. RLS prevalence was 4.1% in 2002 and 7.7% in 2006. The yearly incidence of RLS was 1.7% (6.6% over 4 years). Multivariate analyses demonstrated that estrogen use (OR = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.17-5.10) and self-reported obstructive lung disease (OR = 2.8, 95% CI: 1.37-5.83) were independent risk factors predicting incident RLS. Incident RLS was associated with higher prevalence of insomnia (26.5% vs. 7.6%, p = 0.001), increased sleepiness (38.2% vs. 22%, p = 0.036); and higher sleeping pill use in 2006 (23.5% vs. 9.7%, p = 0.019). Conclusion: The incidence of RLS in this population sample was 1.7% per year. Use of estrogen and history of obstructive lung disease were associated with a signifi cantly higher incidence of RLS. RLS, in turn, was associated with insomnia and increased sleepiness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-124
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2012

Fingerprint

Restless Legs Syndrome
Incidence
Obstructive Lung Diseases
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Sleep
Estrogens
Population
Multicenter Studies
Multivariate Analysis

Keywords

  • COPD
  • Estrogen
  • Incidence
  • Obstructive airway disease
  • Restless legs syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Neurology

Cite this

Budhiraja, P., Budhiraja, R., Goodwin, J. L., Allen, R., Newman, A. B., Koo, B. B., & Quan, S. F. (2012). Incidence of restless legs syndrome and its correlates. Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, 8(2), 119-124. https://doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.1756

Incidence of restless legs syndrome and its correlates. / Budhiraja, Pooja; Budhiraja, Rohit; Goodwin, James L.; Allen, Richard; Newman, Anne B.; Koo, Brian B.; Quan, Stuart F.

In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, Vol. 8, No. 2, 15.04.2012, p. 119-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Budhiraja, P, Budhiraja, R, Goodwin, JL, Allen, R, Newman, AB, Koo, BB & Quan, SF 2012, 'Incidence of restless legs syndrome and its correlates', Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 119-124. https://doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.1756
Budhiraja P, Budhiraja R, Goodwin JL, Allen R, Newman AB, Koo BB et al. Incidence of restless legs syndrome and its correlates. Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. 2012 Apr 15;8(2):119-124. https://doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.1756
Budhiraja, Pooja ; Budhiraja, Rohit ; Goodwin, James L. ; Allen, Richard ; Newman, Anne B. ; Koo, Brian B. ; Quan, Stuart F. / Incidence of restless legs syndrome and its correlates. In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 8, No. 2. pp. 119-124.
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abstract = "Background: Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common sensorimotor disorder whose incidence is not known. The aim of the study was to determine the incidence and correlates of RLS in a population-based sample. Methods: We obtained data from the Tucson Cohort of the Sleep Heart Health Study, a prospective multicenter study. This cohort included 535 participants aged ≥ 40 years, who answered questions regarding RLS on the 2002 and 2006 sleep surveys. For this study, RLS was defi ned as the presence of all 4 International RLS Study Group criteria, with symptoms occurring ≥ 5 days/month and associated with at least moderate distress. Results: Mean age of the predominantly Caucasian (90.8{\%}) participants on the 2002 survey was 59.8 ± 9.7 years; 52.2{\%} were women. RLS prevalence was 4.1{\%} in 2002 and 7.7{\%} in 2006. The yearly incidence of RLS was 1.7{\%} (6.6{\%} over 4 years). Multivariate analyses demonstrated that estrogen use (OR = 2.5, 95{\%} CI: 1.17-5.10) and self-reported obstructive lung disease (OR = 2.8, 95{\%} CI: 1.37-5.83) were independent risk factors predicting incident RLS. Incident RLS was associated with higher prevalence of insomnia (26.5{\%} vs. 7.6{\%}, p = 0.001), increased sleepiness (38.2{\%} vs. 22{\%}, p = 0.036); and higher sleeping pill use in 2006 (23.5{\%} vs. 9.7{\%}, p = 0.019). Conclusion: The incidence of RLS in this population sample was 1.7{\%} per year. Use of estrogen and history of obstructive lung disease were associated with a signifi cantly higher incidence of RLS. RLS, in turn, was associated with insomnia and increased sleepiness.",
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