Incidence of components of metabolic syndrome in the metabolically healthy obese over 9 years follow-up

The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study

P. T. Bradshaw, K. R. Reynolds, L. E. Wagenknecht, Chiadi Ericson Ndumele, J. Stevens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background:Some obese adults are not afflicted by the metabolic abnormalities often associated with obesity (the 'metabolically healthy obese' (MHO)); however, they may be at increased risk of developing cardiometabolic abnormalities in the future. Little is known about the relative incidence of individual components of metabolic syndrome (MetSyn).Methods:We used data from a multicenter, community-based cohort aged 45-64 years at recruitment (the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities study) to examine the first appearance of any MetSyn component, excluding waist circumference. Body mass index (BMI, kg m '2) and cardiometabolic data were collected at four triennial visits. Our analysis included 3969 adults who were not underweight and free of the components of MetSyn at the initial visit. Participants were classified as metabolically healthy normal weight (MHNW), overweight (MHOW) and MHO at each visit. Adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals were estimated with proportional hazards regression models.Results:The relative rate of developing each risk factor was higher among MHO than MHNW, with the strongest association noted for elevated fasting glucose (MHO vs MHNW, HR: 2.33 (1.77, 3.06)). MHO was also positively associated with elevated triglycerides (HR: 1.63 (1.27, 2.09)), low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HR: 1.68 (1.32, 2.13)) and elevated blood pressure (HR: 1.54 (1.26, 1.88)). A similar, but less pronounced pattern was noted among the MHOW vs MHNW.Conclusions:We conclude that even among apparently healthy individuals, obesity and overweight are related to more rapid development of at least one cardiometabolic risk factor, and that elevations in blood glucose develop most rapidly.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)295-301
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

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Atherosclerosis
Weights and Measures
Incidence
Thinness
Waist Circumference
Proportional Hazards Models
LDL Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
Blood Glucose
Fasting
Triglycerides
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Confidence Intervals
Blood Pressure
Glucose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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Incidence of components of metabolic syndrome in the metabolically healthy obese over 9 years follow-up : The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. / Bradshaw, P. T.; Reynolds, K. R.; Wagenknecht, L. E.; Ndumele, Chiadi Ericson; Stevens, J.

In: International Journal of Obesity, Vol. 42, No. 3, 01.03.2018, p. 295-301.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background:Some obese adults are not afflicted by the metabolic abnormalities often associated with obesity (the 'metabolically healthy obese' (MHO)); however, they may be at increased risk of developing cardiometabolic abnormalities in the future. Little is known about the relative incidence of individual components of metabolic syndrome (MetSyn).Methods:We used data from a multicenter, community-based cohort aged 45-64 years at recruitment (the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities study) to examine the first appearance of any MetSyn component, excluding waist circumference. Body mass index (BMI, kg m '2) and cardiometabolic data were collected at four triennial visits. Our analysis included 3969 adults who were not underweight and free of the components of MetSyn at the initial visit. Participants were classified as metabolically healthy normal weight (MHNW), overweight (MHOW) and MHO at each visit. Adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95{\%} confidence intervals were estimated with proportional hazards regression models.Results:The relative rate of developing each risk factor was higher among MHO than MHNW, with the strongest association noted for elevated fasting glucose (MHO vs MHNW, HR: 2.33 (1.77, 3.06)). MHO was also positively associated with elevated triglycerides (HR: 1.63 (1.27, 2.09)), low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HR: 1.68 (1.32, 2.13)) and elevated blood pressure (HR: 1.54 (1.26, 1.88)). A similar, but less pronounced pattern was noted among the MHOW vs MHNW.Conclusions:We conclude that even among apparently healthy individuals, obesity and overweight are related to more rapid development of at least one cardiometabolic risk factor, and that elevations in blood glucose develop most rapidly.",
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