Incidence, Distribution, and Cost of Lawn-Mower Injuries in the United States, 2006-2013

Daniel G. Hottinger, Isam Nasr, Joseph K. Canner, Deepa Kattail, Rahul Koka, Deborah Ann Schwengel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Characterization of the epidemiology and cost of lawn-mower injuries is potentially useful to inform injury prevention and health policy efforts. We examined the incidence, distribution, types and severity, and emergency department (ED) and hospitalization charges of lawn-mower injuries among all age groups across the United States. Methods: This retrospective, cross-sectional study used nationally representative, population-based (all-payer) data from the US Nationwide Emergency Department Sample for lawn-mower–related ED visits and hospitalizations from January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2013. Lawn-mower injuries were identified by using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code E920 (accidents caused by a powered lawn mower). We analyzed data on demographic characteristics, age, geographic distribution, type of injury, injury severity, and hospital charges. Results: We calculated a weighted estimate of 51 151 lawn-mower injuries during the 8-year study period. The most common types of injuries were lacerations (n = 23 907, 46.7%), fractures (n = 11 433, 22.4%), and amputations (n = 11 013, 21.5%). The most common injury locations were wrist or hand (n = 33 477, 65.4%) and foot or toe (n = 10 122, 19.8%). Mean ED charges were $2482 per patient, and mean inpatient charges were $36 987 per patient. The most common procedures performed were wound irrigation or debridement (n = 1436, 29.9%) and amputation (n = 1230, 25.6%). Conclusions: Lawn-mower injuries occurred at a constant rate during the study period. Changes to nationwide industry safety standards are needed to reduce the frequency and severity of these preventable injuries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPublic Health Reports
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Costs and Cost Analysis
Incidence
Wounds and Injuries
Hospital Emergency Service
Amputation
Hospitalization
Hospital Charges
Lacerations
Age Distribution
Toes
International Classification of Diseases
Debridement
Health Policy
Wrist
Accidents
Foot
Inpatients
Industry
Epidemiology
Hand

Keywords

  • burden of disease
  • emergency care
  • epidemiology
  • lawn-mower injuries
  • morbidity and mortality trends
  • noncommunicable disease
  • public health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Incidence, Distribution, and Cost of Lawn-Mower Injuries in the United States, 2006-2013. / Hottinger, Daniel G.; Nasr, Isam; Canner, Joseph K.; Kattail, Deepa; Koka, Rahul; Schwengel, Deborah Ann.

In: Public Health Reports, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objectives: Characterization of the epidemiology and cost of lawn-mower injuries is potentially useful to inform injury prevention and health policy efforts. We examined the incidence, distribution, types and severity, and emergency department (ED) and hospitalization charges of lawn-mower injuries among all age groups across the United States. Methods: This retrospective, cross-sectional study used nationally representative, population-based (all-payer) data from the US Nationwide Emergency Department Sample for lawn-mower–related ED visits and hospitalizations from January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2013. Lawn-mower injuries were identified by using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code E920 (accidents caused by a powered lawn mower). We analyzed data on demographic characteristics, age, geographic distribution, type of injury, injury severity, and hospital charges. Results: We calculated a weighted estimate of 51 151 lawn-mower injuries during the 8-year study period. The most common types of injuries were lacerations (n = 23 907, 46.7{\%}), fractures (n = 11 433, 22.4{\%}), and amputations (n = 11 013, 21.5{\%}). The most common injury locations were wrist or hand (n = 33 477, 65.4{\%}) and foot or toe (n = 10 122, 19.8{\%}). Mean ED charges were $2482 per patient, and mean inpatient charges were $36 987 per patient. The most common procedures performed were wound irrigation or debridement (n = 1436, 29.9{\%}) and amputation (n = 1230, 25.6{\%}). Conclusions: Lawn-mower injuries occurred at a constant rate during the study period. Changes to nationwide industry safety standards are needed to reduce the frequency and severity of these preventable injuries.",
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