Incidence and progression of lens opacities: Effect of hormone replacement therapy and reproductive factors

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is associated in cross-sectional studies with a decreased prevalence of lens opacities. We explored the associations of HRT and reproductive factors with the incidence and progression of lens opacities over a 2-year period. Methods: Data were derived from 1458 women ages 65 years and older from the Salisbury Eye Evaluation population-based prospective cohort study in Salisbury, MD, 1993-1997. Results: HRT was not associated with incident nuclear, cortical, or posterior subcapsular opacities, or with progression of nuclear or cortical opacification. Women who had an early menopause had a higher risk of nuclear progression, whereas those who had a later menopause had a lower risk (linear trend P = 0.013). Other variables related to reproduction, such as oral contraceptive use, age at menarche, number of births, and history of hysterectomy, were not associated with any of the outcomes. Conclusions: These data suggest no evidence of protection against the incidence or progression of lens opacities with HRT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)451-457
Number of pages7
JournalEpidemiology
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2004

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Hormone Replacement Therapy
Cataract
Incidence
Menopause
Reproductive History
Menarche
Oral Contraceptives
Hysterectomy
Reproduction
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Prospective Studies
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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Incidence and progression of lens opacities : Effect of hormone replacement therapy and reproductive factors. / Freeman, Ellen E.; Munoz, Beatriz; Schein, Oliver D; West, Sheila K.

In: Epidemiology, Vol. 15, No. 4, 07.2004, p. 451-457.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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