Incidence and predictors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 seroconversion in patients attending sexually transmitted disease clinics in India

Sanjay M. Mehendale, Jeanette J. Rodrigues, Ronald S. Brookmeyer, Raman R. Gangakhedkar, Anand D. Divekar, Manjusha R. Gokhale, Arun R. Risbud, Ramesh S. Paranjape, Mary E. Shepherd, Ann E. Rompalo, Ramesh S. Paranjape, Sunil N. Tolat, Vijay D. Jadhav, Thomas C. Quinn, Robert C. Bollinger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The first estimates of the seroincidence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and of the risk factors for seroconversion in a cohort of high-risk patients attending sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics in India are reported. Between 1993 and 1995, 851 HIV-1-seronegative persons were evaluated prospectivelyevery 3 months for HIV infection and biologic and behavioral characteristics. The overall incidence of HIV-1 was 10.21100 person-years (95% confidence interval, 7.9-13.1). The incidence among commercial sex workers (CSWs) was 26.11100 person-years, compared with 8.4 among non-CSWs. Recurrent genital ulcer disease and urethritis or cervicitis during the follow-up period were independently associated with a 7- (P <.001) and 3-fold (P =.06) increased risk of HIV-1 seroconversion, respectively. Because of the association of recurrent ulcerative and nonulcerative STDs with HIV-1 seroconversion in this setting, behavioral and biologic measures directed at the prevention and control of STDs would be expected to greatly reduce the transmission of HIV-1 infection in similar high-risk groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1486-1491
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume172
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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