Incidence and predictors of dural venous sinus pressure gradient in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and non-idiopathic intracranial hypertension headache patients: Results from 164 cerebral venograms

Michael R. Levitt, Randall J. Hlubek, Karam Moon, M. Yashar S. Kalani, Peter Nakaji, Kris A. Smith, Andrew S. Little, Kerry Knievel, Jane W. Chan, Cameron McDougall, Felipe C. Albuquerque

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJectiVe Cerebral venous pressure gradient (CVPG) from dural venous sinus stenosis is implicated in headache syndromes such as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). The incidence of CVPG in headache patients has not been reported. MethODS The authors reviewed all cerebral venograms with manometry performed for headache between January 2008 and May 2015. Patient demographics, headache etiology, intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements, and radio-graphic and manometric results were recorded. CVPG was defined as a difference ≥ 8 mm Hg by venographic manometry. reSUltS One hundred sixty-four venograms were performed in 155 patients. There were no procedural complications. Ninety-six procedures (58.5%) were for patients with IIH. The overall incidence of CVPG was 25.6% (42 of 164 procedures): 35.4% (34 of 96 procedures) in IIH patients and 11.8% (8 of 68 procedures) in non-IIH patients. Sixty procedures (36.6%) were performed in patients with preexisting shunts. Seventy-seven patients (49.7%) had procedures preceded by an ICP measurement within 4 weeks of venography, and in 66 (85.7%) of these patients, the ICP had been found to be elevated. CVPG was seen in 8.3% (n = 5) of the procedures in the 60 patients with a preexisting shunt and in 0% (n = 0) of the 11 procedures in the 77 patients with normal ICP (p < 0.001 for both). Noninvasive imaging (MR venography, CT venography) was assessed prior to venography in 112 (68.3%) of 164 cases, and dural venous sinus abnormalities were demonstrated in 73 (65.2%) of these cases; there was a trend toward CVPG (p = 0.07). Multivariate analysis demonstrated an increased likelihood of CVPG in patients with IIH (OR 4.97, 95% CI 1.71–14.47) and a decreased likelihood in patients with a preexisting shunt (OR 0.09, 95% CI 0.02–0.44). cOnclUSiOnS CVPG is uncommon in IIH patients, rare in those with preexisting shunts, and absent in those with normal ICP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-353
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume126
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pseudotumor Cerebri
Venous Pressure
Intracranial Hypertension
Headache
Incidence
Intracranial Pressure
Phlebography
Manometry
Headache Disorders
Radio

Keywords

  • Benign intracranial hypertension
  • Headache
  • Idiopathic intracranial hypertension
  • Interventional neurosurgery
  • Manometry
  • Pseudotumor cerebri
  • Venography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Incidence and predictors of dural venous sinus pressure gradient in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and non-idiopathic intracranial hypertension headache patients : Results from 164 cerebral venograms. / Levitt, Michael R.; Hlubek, Randall J.; Moon, Karam; Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Nakaji, Peter; Smith, Kris A.; Little, Andrew S.; Knievel, Kerry; Chan, Jane W.; McDougall, Cameron; Albuquerque, Felipe C.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 126, No. 2, 01.02.2017, p. 347-353.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Levitt, Michael R. ; Hlubek, Randall J. ; Moon, Karam ; Kalani, M. Yashar S. ; Nakaji, Peter ; Smith, Kris A. ; Little, Andrew S. ; Knievel, Kerry ; Chan, Jane W. ; McDougall, Cameron ; Albuquerque, Felipe C. / Incidence and predictors of dural venous sinus pressure gradient in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and non-idiopathic intracranial hypertension headache patients : Results from 164 cerebral venograms. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 2017 ; Vol. 126, No. 2. pp. 347-353.
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abstract = "OBJectiVe Cerebral venous pressure gradient (CVPG) from dural venous sinus stenosis is implicated in headache syndromes such as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). The incidence of CVPG in headache patients has not been reported. MethODS The authors reviewed all cerebral venograms with manometry performed for headache between January 2008 and May 2015. Patient demographics, headache etiology, intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements, and radio-graphic and manometric results were recorded. CVPG was defined as a difference ≥ 8 mm Hg by venographic manometry. reSUltS One hundred sixty-four venograms were performed in 155 patients. There were no procedural complications. Ninety-six procedures (58.5{\%}) were for patients with IIH. The overall incidence of CVPG was 25.6{\%} (42 of 164 procedures): 35.4{\%} (34 of 96 procedures) in IIH patients and 11.8{\%} (8 of 68 procedures) in non-IIH patients. Sixty procedures (36.6{\%}) were performed in patients with preexisting shunts. Seventy-seven patients (49.7{\%}) had procedures preceded by an ICP measurement within 4 weeks of venography, and in 66 (85.7{\%}) of these patients, the ICP had been found to be elevated. CVPG was seen in 8.3{\%} (n = 5) of the procedures in the 60 patients with a preexisting shunt and in 0{\%} (n = 0) of the 11 procedures in the 77 patients with normal ICP (p < 0.001 for both). Noninvasive imaging (MR venography, CT venography) was assessed prior to venography in 112 (68.3{\%}) of 164 cases, and dural venous sinus abnormalities were demonstrated in 73 (65.2{\%}) of these cases; there was a trend toward CVPG (p = 0.07). Multivariate analysis demonstrated an increased likelihood of CVPG in patients with IIH (OR 4.97, 95{\%} CI 1.71–14.47) and a decreased likelihood in patients with a preexisting shunt (OR 0.09, 95{\%} CI 0.02–0.44). cOnclUSiOnS CVPG is uncommon in IIH patients, rare in those with preexisting shunts, and absent in those with normal ICP.",
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T1 - Incidence and predictors of dural venous sinus pressure gradient in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and non-idiopathic intracranial hypertension headache patients

T2 - Results from 164 cerebral venograms

AU - Levitt, Michael R.

AU - Hlubek, Randall J.

AU - Moon, Karam

AU - Kalani, M. Yashar S.

AU - Nakaji, Peter

AU - Smith, Kris A.

AU - Little, Andrew S.

AU - Knievel, Kerry

AU - Chan, Jane W.

AU - McDougall, Cameron

AU - Albuquerque, Felipe C.

PY - 2017/2/1

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N2 - OBJectiVe Cerebral venous pressure gradient (CVPG) from dural venous sinus stenosis is implicated in headache syndromes such as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). The incidence of CVPG in headache patients has not been reported. MethODS The authors reviewed all cerebral venograms with manometry performed for headache between January 2008 and May 2015. Patient demographics, headache etiology, intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements, and radio-graphic and manometric results were recorded. CVPG was defined as a difference ≥ 8 mm Hg by venographic manometry. reSUltS One hundred sixty-four venograms were performed in 155 patients. There were no procedural complications. Ninety-six procedures (58.5%) were for patients with IIH. The overall incidence of CVPG was 25.6% (42 of 164 procedures): 35.4% (34 of 96 procedures) in IIH patients and 11.8% (8 of 68 procedures) in non-IIH patients. Sixty procedures (36.6%) were performed in patients with preexisting shunts. Seventy-seven patients (49.7%) had procedures preceded by an ICP measurement within 4 weeks of venography, and in 66 (85.7%) of these patients, the ICP had been found to be elevated. CVPG was seen in 8.3% (n = 5) of the procedures in the 60 patients with a preexisting shunt and in 0% (n = 0) of the 11 procedures in the 77 patients with normal ICP (p < 0.001 for both). Noninvasive imaging (MR venography, CT venography) was assessed prior to venography in 112 (68.3%) of 164 cases, and dural venous sinus abnormalities were demonstrated in 73 (65.2%) of these cases; there was a trend toward CVPG (p = 0.07). Multivariate analysis demonstrated an increased likelihood of CVPG in patients with IIH (OR 4.97, 95% CI 1.71–14.47) and a decreased likelihood in patients with a preexisting shunt (OR 0.09, 95% CI 0.02–0.44). cOnclUSiOnS CVPG is uncommon in IIH patients, rare in those with preexisting shunts, and absent in those with normal ICP.

AB - OBJectiVe Cerebral venous pressure gradient (CVPG) from dural venous sinus stenosis is implicated in headache syndromes such as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). The incidence of CVPG in headache patients has not been reported. MethODS The authors reviewed all cerebral venograms with manometry performed for headache between January 2008 and May 2015. Patient demographics, headache etiology, intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements, and radio-graphic and manometric results were recorded. CVPG was defined as a difference ≥ 8 mm Hg by venographic manometry. reSUltS One hundred sixty-four venograms were performed in 155 patients. There were no procedural complications. Ninety-six procedures (58.5%) were for patients with IIH. The overall incidence of CVPG was 25.6% (42 of 164 procedures): 35.4% (34 of 96 procedures) in IIH patients and 11.8% (8 of 68 procedures) in non-IIH patients. Sixty procedures (36.6%) were performed in patients with preexisting shunts. Seventy-seven patients (49.7%) had procedures preceded by an ICP measurement within 4 weeks of venography, and in 66 (85.7%) of these patients, the ICP had been found to be elevated. CVPG was seen in 8.3% (n = 5) of the procedures in the 60 patients with a preexisting shunt and in 0% (n = 0) of the 11 procedures in the 77 patients with normal ICP (p < 0.001 for both). Noninvasive imaging (MR venography, CT venography) was assessed prior to venography in 112 (68.3%) of 164 cases, and dural venous sinus abnormalities were demonstrated in 73 (65.2%) of these cases; there was a trend toward CVPG (p = 0.07). Multivariate analysis demonstrated an increased likelihood of CVPG in patients with IIH (OR 4.97, 95% CI 1.71–14.47) and a decreased likelihood in patients with a preexisting shunt (OR 0.09, 95% CI 0.02–0.44). cOnclUSiOnS CVPG is uncommon in IIH patients, rare in those with preexisting shunts, and absent in those with normal ICP.

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KW - Headache

KW - Idiopathic intracranial hypertension

KW - Interventional neurosurgery

KW - Manometry

KW - Pseudotumor cerebri

KW - Venography

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