Incidence and long-term outcomes of the human immunodeficiency virus neuroretinal disorder in patients with AIDS

Douglas Jabs, Lea Drye, Mark L Van Natta, Jennifer Thorne, Gary N. Holland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose Patients with AIDS have an abnormality of retina/optic nerve function, manifested as decreased contrast sensitivity (in the absence of ocular opportunistic infections or media opacity), abnormalities on automated perimetry, and loss of retinal nerve fiber layer, even among those with good visual acuity, termed the "human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) neuroretinal disorder." The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence, incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of HIV neuroretinal disorder. Design Prospective cohort study. Participants A total of 1822 patients with AIDS without ocular infections or media opacities. Methods Patients with HIV neuroretinal disorder were identified by a contrast sensitivity

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)760-768
Number of pages9
JournalOphthalmology
Volume122
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

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Eye Infections
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Contrast Sensitivity
HIV
Incidence
Visual Field Tests
Opportunistic Infections
Optic Nerve
Nerve Fibers
Visual Acuity
Retina
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Incidence and long-term outcomes of the human immunodeficiency virus neuroretinal disorder in patients with AIDS. / Jabs, Douglas; Drye, Lea; Van Natta, Mark L; Thorne, Jennifer; Holland, Gary N.

In: Ophthalmology, Vol. 122, No. 4, 01.04.2015, p. 760-768.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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