Incidence and characteristics of unintentional injuries among children in a resource limited setting in Kampala, Uganda

Charles Ssemugabo, Trasias Mukama, Abdullah Ali Halage, Nino Paichadze, Dustin G. Gibson, Olive Kobusingye

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Given that little is known about the epidemiology of unintentional injuries in children in low-income countries, this study sought to determine the incidence and characteristics of unintentional injuries among children aged ≤18 years in a slum community in Uganda. From a household survey, the incidence and odds ratios for factors associated with unintentional injury characteristics were calculated. Of 1583 children, 706 had suffered 787 unintentional injuries yielding an annual incidence rate of 497 injuries per 1000 children. Commonest injuries were cuts, bites or open wounds (30.6%) and bruises or superficial injuries (28.6%) with majority (75.5%) occurring at home. Boys were more likely to be injured at school (AOR 4.34; 95% CI 1.22–15.54) and to be injured from falls (AOR 1.41; 95% CI 1.01–1.96). Older children (12–18 years) were more likely to suffer from fractures (AOR 2.37; 95% CI 1.26–4.43), concussions and organ system injuries (AOR 3.58; 95% CI 1.03–12.39) and cuts, bites or open wounds (AOR 2.05; 95% CI 1.21–3.48). Older children were less likely to suffer burns or scalds as compared to the young children (AOR: 0.23; 95% CI 0.11–0.50). Unintentional injury incidence rate was high among children with most occurring in the homes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)449-457
Number of pages9
JournalInternational journal of injury control and safety promotion
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2018

Keywords

  • Incidence
  • Uganda
  • children
  • injury
  • slum
  • unintentional

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Safety Research
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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