In vivo textural and morphometric analysis of placental development in healthy & growth-restricted pregnancies using magnetic resonance imaging

Nickie Andescavage, Sonia Dahdouh, Marni Jacobs, Sayali Yewale, Dorothy Bulas, Sara Iqbal, Ahmet Baschat, Catherine Limperopoulos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The objective of this study was to characterize structural changes in the healthy in vivo placenta by applying morphometric and textural analysis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to explore features that may be able to distinguish placental insufficiency in fetal growth restriction (FGR). Methods: Women with healthy pregnancies or pregnancies complicated by FGR underwent MRI between 20 and 40 weeks gestation. Measures of placental morphometry (volume, elongation, depth) and digital texture (voxel-wise geometric and signal-intensity analysis) were calculated from T2W MR images. Results: We studied 66 pregnant women (32 healthy controls, 34 FGR); during the study period, placentas undergo significant increases in size; signal intensity remains relatively constant, however there is increasing variation in spatial arrangements, suggestive of progressive microstructural heterogeneity. In FGR, placental size is smaller, with great homogeneity of signal intensity and spatial arrangements. Conclusion: We report quantitative textural and morphometric changes in the in vivo placenta in healthy controls over the second half of pregnancy. These MRI features demonstrate important differences in placental development in the setting of placental insufficiency that relate to onset and severity of FGR, as well as neonatal outcome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)974-981
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric research
Volume85
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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