In vivo solvent-suppressed localized hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: A window to metabolism?

P. A. Bottomley, W. A. Edelstein, T. H. Foster, W. A. Adams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Solvent-suppression NMR techniques are combined with a pulsed magnetic field gradient and surface coil detection method of spatial localization. The result is a technique that enables observation of metabolites in the hydrogen (1H) NMR chemical-shift spectra from preselected disk-shaped volumes of biological tissue in vivo. Localized spectra are recorded from the normal human brain and forearm and from a dog in acquisition periods of 2 s using a 1.5-T imaging/spectroscopy system. This is several hundred-fold faster than acquiring similar state-of-the-art 31P NMR spectra of brain metabolites in vivo. Spectroscopy experiments are followed by conventional surface coil imaging sequences to precisely define the selected volume. Contamination of spectra by lipid resonances is a problem.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2148-2152
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume82
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1985
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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