In vivo photoacoustic imaging of major blood vessels in the pancreas and liver during surgery

Kelley M. Kempski, Alycen Wiacek, Michelle Graham, Eduardo González, Bria Goodson, Derek Allman, Jasmin Palmer, Huayu Hou, Sarah Beck, Jin He, Muyinatu A.Lediju Bell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Abdominal surgeries carry considerable risk of gastrointestinal and intra-abdominal hemorrhage, which could possibly cause patient death. Photoacoustic imaging is one solution to overcome this challenge by providing visualization of major blood vessels during surgery. We investigate the feasibility of <italic>in vivo</italic> blood vessel visualization for photoacoustic-guided liver and pancreas surgeries. <italic>In vivo</italic> photoacoustic imaging of major blood vessels in these two abdominal organs was successfully achieved after a laparotomy was performed on two swine. Three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging with a robot-controlled ultrasound (US) probe and color Doppler imaging were used to confirm vessel locations. Blood vessels in the <italic>in vivo</italic> liver were visualized with energies of 20 to 40 mJ, resulting in 10 to 15 dB vessel contrast. Similarly, an energy of 36 mJ was sufficient to visualize vessels in the pancreas with up to 17.3 dB contrast. We observed that photoacoustic signals were more focused when the light source encountered a major vessel in the liver. This observation can be used to distinguish major blood vessels in the image plane from the more diffuse signals associated with smaller blood vessels in the surrounding tissue. A postsurgery histopathological analysis was performed on resected pancreatic and liver tissues to explore possible laser-related damage. Results are generally promising for photoacoustic-guided abdominal surgery when the US probe is fixed and the light source is used to interrogate the surgical workspace. These findings are additionally applicable to other procedures that may benefit from photoacoustic-guided interventional imaging of the liver and pancreas (e.g., biopsy and guidance of radiofrequency ablation lesions in the liver).

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Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of biomedical optics
Volume24
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2019

Fingerprint

pancreas
Photoacoustic effect
blood vessels
Blood vessels
liver
surgery
Liver
Surgery
Imaging techniques
vessels
light sources
Light sources
Visualization
Ultrasonics
hemorrhages
Tissue
swine
laser damage
probes
robots

Keywords

  • interventional imaging
  • liver surgery
  • pancreatic surgery
  • photoacoustic-guided surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Kempski, K. M., Wiacek, A., Graham, M., González, E., Goodson, B., Allman, D., ... Bell, M. A. L. (2019). In vivo photoacoustic imaging of major blood vessels in the pancreas and liver during surgery. Journal of biomedical optics, 24(12), 1-12. https://doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.24.12.121905

In vivo photoacoustic imaging of major blood vessels in the pancreas and liver during surgery. / Kempski, Kelley M.; Wiacek, Alycen; Graham, Michelle; González, Eduardo; Goodson, Bria; Allman, Derek; Palmer, Jasmin; Hou, Huayu; Beck, Sarah; He, Jin; Bell, Muyinatu A.Lediju.

In: Journal of biomedical optics, Vol. 24, No. 12, 01.08.2019, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kempski, KM, Wiacek, A, Graham, M, González, E, Goodson, B, Allman, D, Palmer, J, Hou, H, Beck, S, He, J & Bell, MAL 2019, 'In vivo photoacoustic imaging of major blood vessels in the pancreas and liver during surgery', Journal of biomedical optics, vol. 24, no. 12, pp. 1-12. https://doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.24.12.121905
Kempski, Kelley M. ; Wiacek, Alycen ; Graham, Michelle ; González, Eduardo ; Goodson, Bria ; Allman, Derek ; Palmer, Jasmin ; Hou, Huayu ; Beck, Sarah ; He, Jin ; Bell, Muyinatu A.Lediju. / In vivo photoacoustic imaging of major blood vessels in the pancreas and liver during surgery. In: Journal of biomedical optics. 2019 ; Vol. 24, No. 12. pp. 1-12.
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