In vivo microRNA-155 expression influences antigen-specific T cell-mediated immune responses generated by DNA vaccination

Chih Ping Mao, Liangmei He, Ya Chea Tsai, Shiwen Peng, Tae H. Kang, Xiaowu Pang, Archana Monie, Chien-Fu Hung, Tzyy Choou Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: MicroRNA (miRNA) molecules are potent mediators of post-transcriptional gene silencing that are emerging to be critical in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity.Results: Here we report that miR-155--an oncogenic miRNA with important function in the mammalian immune system--is induced in dendritic cells (DCs) upon maturation and potentially attenuates their ability to activate T cells. Biolistic epidermal transfection with DNA encoding miR-155 suppressed the induction of antigen-specific T cell-mediated immunity, whereas reduction of endogenous miR-155 by a partially complementary antisense sequence reversed this effect. Because DCs represent a significant component of epidermal tissue and are among the most potent of antigen-presenting cells, the inhibitory actions of miR-155 could be mediated through this subset of cells.Conclusions: These results suggest that miR-155 may repress the expression of key molecules involved in lymph node migration, antigen presentation, or T cell activation in DCs, and thus forms part of a negative regulatory pathway that dampens the generation of T cell-mediated immune responses. Modulation of miR-155 expression in epidermis therefore represents a potentially promising form of gene therapy for the control of diseases ranging from autoimmunity to cancer and viral infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number3
JournalCell and Bioscience
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 18 2011

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T-cells
MicroRNAs
Vaccination
Dendritic Cells
T-Lymphocytes
Antigens
DNA
Biolistics
Gene therapy
Molecules
Immune system
Antigen Presentation
Adaptive Immunity
Antigen-Presenting Cells
Virus Diseases
RNA Interference
Autoimmunity
Innate Immunity
Epidermis
Cellular Immunity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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In vivo microRNA-155 expression influences antigen-specific T cell-mediated immune responses generated by DNA vaccination. / Mao, Chih Ping; He, Liangmei; Tsai, Ya Chea; Peng, Shiwen; Kang, Tae H.; Pang, Xiaowu; Monie, Archana; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, Tzyy Choou.

In: Cell and Bioscience, Vol. 1, No. 1, 3, 18.01.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - He, Liangmei

AU - Tsai, Ya Chea

AU - Peng, Shiwen

AU - Kang, Tae H.

AU - Pang, Xiaowu

AU - Monie, Archana

AU - Hung, Chien-Fu

AU - Wu, Tzyy Choou

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