In vitro T cell-mediated killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. II. The role of macrophages and T cell subsets in T cell killing

R. B. Markham, G. B. Pier, J. J. Goellner, S. B. Mizel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

T lymphocytes from immune mice can adoptively transfer protection against infection with the extracellular Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa to nonimmune recipients, and in vitro, immune T cells are able to kill these bacteria. Earlier studies indicated that this killing is mediated by a bactericidal lymphokine. Those studies also showed that macrophages enhance this in vitro T cell killing but do not directly participate in the bacterial killing, nor do macrophages function to present antigen to T cells. The current studies demonstrate that the ability of macrophages to enhance T cell killing can be replaced by macrophage culture supernatants or by purified recombinant interleukin 1 (IL 1). In addition, the macrophage supernatant-induced enhancement can also be blocked by antibody to purified IL 1. These studies also demonstrate that the T cell subset that serves as the final effector cell in the killing process is the Lyt-1-,2,3+,I-J+ phenotype.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4112-4117
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume134
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1985

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'In vitro T cell-mediated killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. II. The role of macrophages and T cell subsets in T cell killing'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this