In vitro susceptibilities of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli isolated from patients with intra-abdominal infections worldwide: 2004 results from SMART (Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends)

Flávia Rossi, Fernando Baquero, Po Ren Hsueh, David L. Paterson, Grant V. Bochicchio, Theresa A. Snyder, Vilas Satishchandran, Kathleen McCarroll, Mark J. DiNubile, Joseph W. Chow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: SMART (Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends) is an ongoing study to monitor worldwide antimicrobial resistance trends among aerobic and facultatively anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) isolated from intra-abdominal infections. This 2004 report summarizes the most recently completed annual data from SMART. Methods: During 2004, 81 medical centres from 28 countries in five global regions collected intra-abdominal GNB for antimicrobial susceptibility testing using broth microdilution according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Results: A total of 6156 unique aerobic and facultatively anaerobic GNB were isolated from intra-abdominal infections. Enterobacteriaceae composed 86% of the total isolates. Among the 12 antimicrobial agents tested, the carbapenems and amikacin were the most consistently active against the Enterobacteriaceae. Escherichia coli was the most commonly isolated species (48%), and the susceptibility rate to the quinolones was lowest in Asia/Pacific and Latin America. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) were detected phenotypically in 10% of E. coli, 17% of Klebsiella spp. and 22% of Enterobacter spp. worldwide, representing a slight increase over the two previous years. ESBL producers typically had a more antibiotic-resistant profile than non-ESBL producers but were usually susceptible to the carbapenems. Conclusions: Antimicrobial resistance among GNB isolated from intra-abdominal infections continued to be a problem worldwide in 2004, with the highest rates of resistance overall in the Asia/Pacific region. The carbapenems and amikacin were the most consistently active agents in vitro against Enterobacteriaceae isolated from intra-abdominal infections worldwide.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-210
Number of pages6
JournalThe Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy
Volume58
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Intraabdominal Infections
Bacillus
Carbapenems
Enterobacteriaceae
Amikacin
Escherichia coli
Enterobacter
Klebsiella
Latin America
Quinolones
Anti-Infective Agents
Guidelines
Anti-Bacterial Agents
In Vitro Techniques

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial susceptibility
  • Enterobacteriaceae
  • ESBLs
  • Extended-spectrum β-lactamases
  • In vitro susceptibility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Microbiology

Cite this

In vitro susceptibilities of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli isolated from patients with intra-abdominal infections worldwide : 2004 results from SMART (Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends). / Rossi, Flávia; Baquero, Fernando; Hsueh, Po Ren; Paterson, David L.; Bochicchio, Grant V.; Snyder, Theresa A.; Satishchandran, Vilas; McCarroll, Kathleen; DiNubile, Mark J.; Chow, Joseph W.

In: The Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy, Vol. 58, No. 1, 07.2006, p. 205-210.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rossi, Flávia ; Baquero, Fernando ; Hsueh, Po Ren ; Paterson, David L. ; Bochicchio, Grant V. ; Snyder, Theresa A. ; Satishchandran, Vilas ; McCarroll, Kathleen ; DiNubile, Mark J. ; Chow, Joseph W. / In vitro susceptibilities of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli isolated from patients with intra-abdominal infections worldwide : 2004 results from SMART (Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends). In: The Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy. 2006 ; Vol. 58, No. 1. pp. 205-210.
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abstract = "Objectives: SMART (Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends) is an ongoing study to monitor worldwide antimicrobial resistance trends among aerobic and facultatively anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) isolated from intra-abdominal infections. This 2004 report summarizes the most recently completed annual data from SMART. Methods: During 2004, 81 medical centres from 28 countries in five global regions collected intra-abdominal GNB for antimicrobial susceptibility testing using broth microdilution according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Results: A total of 6156 unique aerobic and facultatively anaerobic GNB were isolated from intra-abdominal infections. Enterobacteriaceae composed 86{\%} of the total isolates. Among the 12 antimicrobial agents tested, the carbapenems and amikacin were the most consistently active against the Enterobacteriaceae. Escherichia coli was the most commonly isolated species (48{\%}), and the susceptibility rate to the quinolones was lowest in Asia/Pacific and Latin America. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) were detected phenotypically in 10{\%} of E. coli, 17{\%} of Klebsiella spp. and 22{\%} of Enterobacter spp. worldwide, representing a slight increase over the two previous years. ESBL producers typically had a more antibiotic-resistant profile than non-ESBL producers but were usually susceptible to the carbapenems. Conclusions: Antimicrobial resistance among GNB isolated from intra-abdominal infections continued to be a problem worldwide in 2004, with the highest rates of resistance overall in the Asia/Pacific region. The carbapenems and amikacin were the most consistently active agents in vitro against Enterobacteriaceae isolated from intra-abdominal infections worldwide.",
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AU - Baquero, Fernando

AU - Hsueh, Po Ren

AU - Paterson, David L.

AU - Bochicchio, Grant V.

AU - Snyder, Theresa A.

AU - Satishchandran, Vilas

AU - McCarroll, Kathleen

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AU - Chow, Joseph W.

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