IN VITRO STUDIES OF THE BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In the brain, microvascular endothelial cells are sealed together by continuous tight junctions and contain few pinocytotic vesicles. These features underlie formation of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) which markedly restricts the free diffusion of water soluble molecules between the plasma and interstitial fluid of the nervous system. These studies document the usefulness of endothelial cells in culture to investigate function of the blood-brain barrier. One of the goals is to establish a proper permeable support matrix upon which to investigate the transcellular movement of organic molecules and ions known to permeate the intact blood-brain barrier.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmerican Chemical Society, Polymer Preprints, Division of Polymer Chemistry
EditorsBill M. Culbertson, Judith S. Riffle, Frank D. Blum, Harry W. Gibson
PublisherACS
Pages425
Number of pages1
Volume27
Edition2
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1986
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Polymers and Plastics

Cite this

Goldstein, G. W. (1986). IN VITRO STUDIES OF THE BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER. In B. M. Culbertson, J. S. Riffle, F. D. Blum, & H. W. Gibson (Eds.), American Chemical Society, Polymer Preprints, Division of Polymer Chemistry (2 ed., Vol. 27, pp. 425). ACS.