In vitro galactosylation of a 110-kDa glycoprotein by an endogenous cell surface galactosyltransferase correlates with the invasiveness of adrenal carcinoma cells

M. B. Penno, A. Passaniti, R. Fridman, G. W. Hart, C. Jordan, S. Kumar, A. F. Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We have examined the role of a cell surface galactosyltransferase, laminin, and laminin-binding protein (receptor) in the invasion of clonal derivatives of a murine adrenal carcinoma cell line. Although a 10-fold variation was found in the ability to invade a reconstituted basement membrane matrix, levels of intracellular laminin and the laminin-binding protein were shown to be present and secreted equally in all lines. Of the eight lines tested, seven showed a correlation between invasion and the incorporation of [3H]galactose from UDP-[3H]galactose into a 90- to 100-kDa protein. One noninvasive line (clone HSR), however, retained high galactosyltransferase activity yet could not galactosylate the endogenous 90- to 110-kDa substrate. Interestingly, this clone was unable to attach to laminin. Although high galactosyltransferase activity can be consistent with cells of high invasiveness, our results suggest that the galactosylation status of a 90- to 110-kDa Y1 cell surface glycoprotein is most indicative of invasion potential.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6057-6061
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume86
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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