In-plane myocardial wall stress is not the primary determinant of coronary systolic flow impediment: A study in the isolated, perfused dog septum

J. R. Resar, J. Z. Livingston, F. C.P. Yin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The hypothesis that ventricular in-plane tensile wall stresses are the major determinant of systolic coronary flow was investigated in this study. We measured coronary artery inflow in the maximally vasodilated bed of the isolated beating septum (n = 10) during two modes of contraction characterized by markedly different levels of developed in-plane stress. An increase in contractility was induced by changing from the control steady- state pacing state to a postextrasystolic potentiated state induced by a modified rapid pacing protocol. Over a range of increments of passive stretch, the systolic flow impediment versus the diastolic wall strain was described by an inverse linear relation. Despite the differences in developed in-plane wall stresses between the two modes of contraction (p < 0.001), the slope and intercept of these relations in both the control and potentiated states were not different for the low versus high developed stress modes. The systolic flow impediment versus diastolic wall strain relation for the potentiated beats, compared with the control beats, was characterized by an increase in the intercept in both the low developed stress beats (p < 0.05) and the high developed stress beats (p < 0.05). These data indicate that the impediment to coronary flow during systole is not primarily determined by systolic myocardial in-plane tensile wall stresses but rather by the contractile state of the muscle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)583-592
Number of pages10
JournalCirculation research
Volume70
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • systolic coronary flow
  • ventricular wall stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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