In-home particle concentrations and childhood asthma morbidity

Meredith McCormack, Patrick N Breysse, Elizabeth C. Matsui, Nadia Hansel, D'Ann Williams, Jean Curtin-Brosnan, Peyton Eggleston, Gregory B Diette

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Although outdoor particulate matter (PM) has been linked to mortality and asthma morbidity, the impact of indoor PM on asthma has not been well established. Objective: This study was designed to investigate the effect of in-home PM on asthma morbidity. Methods: For a cohort of 150 asthmatic children (2-6 years of age) from Baltimore, Maryland, a technician deployed environmental monitoring equipment in the children's bedrooms for 3-day intervals at baseline and at 3 and 6 months. Caregivers completed questionnaires and daily diaries during air sampling. Longitudinal data analyses included regression models with generalized estimating equations. Results: Children were primarily African Americans (91%) from lower socioeconomic backgrounds and spent most of their time in the home. Mean (± SD) indoor PM2.5-10 (PM with aerodynamic diameter 2.5-10 μm) and PM2.5 (aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm) concentrations were 17.4 ± 21.0 and 40.3 ± 35.4 μg/m3. In adjusted models, 10-μg/m3 increases in indoor PM2.5-10 and PM2.5 were associated with increased incidences of asthma symptoms: 6% [95% confidence interval (CI), 1 to 12%] and 3% (95% CI, -1 to 7%), respectively; symptoms causing children to slow down: 8% (95% CI, 2 to 14%) and 4% (95% CI, 0 to 9%), respectively; nocturnal symptoms: 8% (95% CI, 1 to 14%) and 6% (95% CI, 1 to 10%), respectively; wheezing that limited speech: 11% (95% CI, 3 to 19%) and 7% (95% CI, 0 to 14%), respectively; and use of rescue medication: 6% (95% CI, 1 to 10%) and 4% (95% CI, 1 to 8%), respectively. Increases of 10 μg/m3 in indoor and ambient PM2.5 were associated with 7% (95% CI, 2 to 11%) and 26% (95% CI, 1 to 52%) increases in exercise-related symptoms, respectively. Conclusions: Among preschool asthmatic children in Baltimore, increases in in-home PM2.5-10 and PM2.5 were associated with respiratory symptoms and rescue medication use. Increases in in-home and ambient PM2.5 were associated with exercise-related symptoms. Although reducing PM outdoors may decrease asthma morbidity, reducing PM indoors, especially in homes of inner-city children, may lead to improved asthma health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)294-298
Number of pages5
JournalEnvironmental Health Perspectives
Volume117
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

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Asthma
Confidence Intervals
Morbidity
Particulate Matter
Baltimore
Exercise
Environmental Monitoring
Respiratory Sounds
Preschool Children
African Americans
Caregivers
Air
Equipment and Supplies
Mortality
Incidence
Health

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • Asthma
  • Indoor
  • Particulate matter
  • Pediatric
  • Urban

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

In-home particle concentrations and childhood asthma morbidity. / McCormack, Meredith; Breysse, Patrick N; Matsui, Elizabeth C.; Hansel, Nadia; Williams, D'Ann; Curtin-Brosnan, Jean; Eggleston, Peyton; Diette, Gregory B.

In: Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol. 117, No. 2, 2009, p. 294-298.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McCormack, Meredith ; Breysse, Patrick N ; Matsui, Elizabeth C. ; Hansel, Nadia ; Williams, D'Ann ; Curtin-Brosnan, Jean ; Eggleston, Peyton ; Diette, Gregory B. / In-home particle concentrations and childhood asthma morbidity. In: Environmental Health Perspectives. 2009 ; Vol. 117, No. 2. pp. 294-298.
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abstract = "Background: Although outdoor particulate matter (PM) has been linked to mortality and asthma morbidity, the impact of indoor PM on asthma has not been well established. Objective: This study was designed to investigate the effect of in-home PM on asthma morbidity. Methods: For a cohort of 150 asthmatic children (2-6 years of age) from Baltimore, Maryland, a technician deployed environmental monitoring equipment in the children's bedrooms for 3-day intervals at baseline and at 3 and 6 months. Caregivers completed questionnaires and daily diaries during air sampling. Longitudinal data analyses included regression models with generalized estimating equations. Results: Children were primarily African Americans (91{\%}) from lower socioeconomic backgrounds and spent most of their time in the home. Mean (± SD) indoor PM2.5-10 (PM with aerodynamic diameter 2.5-10 μm) and PM2.5 (aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm) concentrations were 17.4 ± 21.0 and 40.3 ± 35.4 μg/m3. In adjusted models, 10-μg/m3 increases in indoor PM2.5-10 and PM2.5 were associated with increased incidences of asthma symptoms: 6{\%} [95{\%} confidence interval (CI), 1 to 12{\%}] and 3{\%} (95{\%} CI, -1 to 7{\%}), respectively; symptoms causing children to slow down: 8{\%} (95{\%} CI, 2 to 14{\%}) and 4{\%} (95{\%} CI, 0 to 9{\%}), respectively; nocturnal symptoms: 8{\%} (95{\%} CI, 1 to 14{\%}) and 6{\%} (95{\%} CI, 1 to 10{\%}), respectively; wheezing that limited speech: 11{\%} (95{\%} CI, 3 to 19{\%}) and 7{\%} (95{\%} CI, 0 to 14{\%}), respectively; and use of rescue medication: 6{\%} (95{\%} CI, 1 to 10{\%}) and 4{\%} (95{\%} CI, 1 to 8{\%}), respectively. Increases of 10 μg/m3 in indoor and ambient PM2.5 were associated with 7{\%} (95{\%} CI, 2 to 11{\%}) and 26{\%} (95{\%} CI, 1 to 52{\%}) increases in exercise-related symptoms, respectively. Conclusions: Among preschool asthmatic children in Baltimore, increases in in-home PM2.5-10 and PM2.5 were associated with respiratory symptoms and rescue medication use. Increases in in-home and ambient PM2.5 were associated with exercise-related symptoms. Although reducing PM outdoors may decrease asthma morbidity, reducing PM indoors, especially in homes of inner-city children, may lead to improved asthma health.",
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