Impulsiveness in obsessive-compulsive patients

Rudolf Hoehn-Saric, V. C. Barksdale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Obsessive-compulsive patients with a history of poor impulse control were identified and compared with non-impulsive obsessive-compulsive patients. Although both groups reported comparable obsessive-compulsive symptoms, the impulsive group rated significantly higher on disturbances during childhood, which included learning problems, low frustration tolerance, poor interpersonal relationships and attention-seeking behaviour. The impulsive group also scored highly on the neuroticism scale of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire and reported a higher incidence of somatic symptoms. It appears that poor impulse control was related to disturbances which had already manifested themselves during childhood, while the obsessive-compulsive disorder was superimposed at a later time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)177-182
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Psychiatry
Volume143
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1983

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Frustration
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Personality
Learning
Incidence
Medically Unexplained Symptoms
Neuroticism
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Impulsiveness in obsessive-compulsive patients. / Hoehn-Saric, Rudolf; Barksdale, V. C.

In: British Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 143, No. 2, 1983, p. 177-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hoehn-Saric, Rudolf ; Barksdale, V. C. / Impulsiveness in obsessive-compulsive patients. In: British Journal of Psychiatry. 1983 ; Vol. 143, No. 2. pp. 177-182.
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