Impulsive-aggressive behaviours and completed suicide across the life cycle

A predisposition for younger age of suicide

A. McGirr, J. Renaud, Alexandre Bureau, M. Seguin, A. Lesage, G. Turecki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. It is unclear whether the association between impulsive-aggressive behaviours and suicide exists across different ages. Method. Via psychological autopsy, we examined a total of 645 subjects aged 11-87 years who died by suicide. Proxy-based interviews were conducted using the SCID-I & SCID-II or K-SADS interviews and a series of behavioural and personality-trait assessments. Secondarily, 246 living controls were similarly assessed. Results. Higher levels of impulsivity, lifetime history of aggression, and novelty seeking were associated with younger age of death by suicide, while increasing levels of harm avoidance were associated with increasing age of suicide. This effect was observed after accounting for age-related psychopathology (current and lifetime depressive disorders, lifetime anxiety disorders, current and lifetime substance abuse disorders, psychotic disorders and cluster B personality disorders). Age effects were not due to the characteristics of informants, and such effects were not observed among living controls. When directly controlling for major psychopathology, the interaction between age, levels of impulsivity, aggression and novelty seeking predicted suicide status while controlling for the independent contributions of age and these traits. Conclusions. Higher levels of impulsive-aggressive traits play a greater role in suicide occurring among younger individuals, with decreasing importance with increasing age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)407-417
Number of pages11
JournalPsychological medicine
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Impulsive Behavior
Life Cycle Stages
Suicide
Aggression
Psychopathology
Interviews
Personality Assessment
Personality Disorders
Proxy
Depressive Disorder
Anxiety Disorders
Psychotic Disorders
Substance-Related Disorders
Autopsy
Psychology

Keywords

  • Age effects
  • Behavioural predictors
  • Personality traits
  • Suicide completion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Impulsive-aggressive behaviours and completed suicide across the life cycle : A predisposition for younger age of suicide. / McGirr, A.; Renaud, J.; Bureau, Alexandre; Seguin, M.; Lesage, A.; Turecki, G.

In: Psychological medicine, Vol. 38, No. 3, 01.03.2008, p. 407-417.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McGirr, A. ; Renaud, J. ; Bureau, Alexandre ; Seguin, M. ; Lesage, A. ; Turecki, G. / Impulsive-aggressive behaviours and completed suicide across the life cycle : A predisposition for younger age of suicide. In: Psychological medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 38, No. 3. pp. 407-417.
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