Improving Pediatric Rapid Response Team Performance Through Crew Resource Management Training of Team Leaders

Ashley Siems, Alexander Cartron, Anne Watson, Robert McCarter, Amanda Levin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Rapid response teams (RRTs) improve the detection of and response to deteriorating patients. Professional hierarchies and the multidisciplinary nature of RRTs hinder team performance. This study assessed whether an intervention involving crew resource management training of team leaders could improve team performance.

METHODS: In situ observations of RRT activations were performed pre- and post-training intervention. Team performance and dynamics were measured by observed adherence to an ideal task list and by the Team Emergency Assessment Measure tool, respectively. Multiple quartile (median) and logistic regression models were developed to evaluate change in performance scores or completion of specific tasks.

RESULTS: Team leader and team introductions (40% to 90%, P = .004; 7% to 45%, P = .03), floor team presentations in Situation Background Assessment Recommendation format (20% to 65%, P = .01), and confirmation of the plan (7% to 70%, P = .002) improved after training in patients transferred to the ICU (n = 35). The Team Emergency Assessment Measure metric was improved in all 4 categories: leadership (2.5 to 3.5, P < .001), teamwork (2.7 to 3.7, P < .001), task management (2.9 to 3.8, P < .001), and global scores (6.0 to 9.0, P < .001) for teams caring for patients who required transfer to the ICU.

CONCLUSIONS: Targeted crew resource management training of the team leader resulted in improved team performance and dynamics for patients requiring transfer to the ICU. The intervention demonstrated that training the team leader improved behavior in RRT members who were not trained.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)88-95
Number of pages8
JournalHospital pediatrics
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Pediatrics
Emergencies
Logistic Models
Patient Transfer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pediatrics

Cite this

Improving Pediatric Rapid Response Team Performance Through Crew Resource Management Training of Team Leaders. / Siems, Ashley; Cartron, Alexander; Watson, Anne; McCarter, Robert; Levin, Amanda.

In: Hospital pediatrics, Vol. 7, No. 2, 01.02.2017, p. 88-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Siems, Ashley ; Cartron, Alexander ; Watson, Anne ; McCarter, Robert ; Levin, Amanda. / Improving Pediatric Rapid Response Team Performance Through Crew Resource Management Training of Team Leaders. In: Hospital pediatrics. 2017 ; Vol. 7, No. 2. pp. 88-95.
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