Improving metabolic health through precision dietetics in mice

William T. Barrington, Phillip Wulfridge, Ann E. Wells, Carolina Mantilla Rojas, Selene Y.F. Howe, Amie Perry, Kunjie Hua, Michael A. Pellizzon, Kasper Daniel Hansen, Brynn H. Voy, Brian J. Bennett, Daniel Pomp, Andrew P Feinberg, David W. Threadgill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The incidence of diet-induced metabolic disease has soared over the last half-century, despite national efforts to improve health through universal dietary recommendations. Studies comparing dietary patterns of populations with health outcomes have historically provided the basis for healthy diet recommendations. However, evidence that population-level diet responses are reliable indicators of responses across individuals is lacking. This study investigated how genetic differences influence health responses to several popular diets in mice, which are similar to humans in genetic composition and the propensity to develop metabolic disease, but enable precise genetic and environmental control. We designed four human-comparable mouse diets that are representative of those eaten by historical human populations. Across four genetically distinct inbred mouse strains, we compared the American diet’s impact on metabolic health to three alternative diets (Mediterranean, Japanese, and Maasai/ketogenic). Furthermore, we investigated metabolomic and epigenetic alterations associated with diet response. Health effects of the diets were highly dependent on genetic background, demonstrating that individualized diet strategies improve health outcomes in mice. If similar genetic-dependent diet responses exist in humans, then a personalized, or “precision dietetics,” approach to dietary recommendations may yield better health outcomes than the traditional one-size-fits-all approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-417
Number of pages19
JournalGenetics
Volume208
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Dietetics
Diet
Health
Metabolic Diseases
Population
Mediterranean Diet
Inbred Strains Mice
Metabolomics
Medical Genetics
Epigenomics
Incidence

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Mouse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

Cite this

Barrington, W. T., Wulfridge, P., Wells, A. E., Rojas, C. M., Howe, S. Y. F., Perry, A., ... Threadgill, D. W. (2018). Improving metabolic health through precision dietetics in mice. Genetics, 208(1), 399-417. https://doi.org/10.1534/genetics.117.300536

Improving metabolic health through precision dietetics in mice. / Barrington, William T.; Wulfridge, Phillip; Wells, Ann E.; Rojas, Carolina Mantilla; Howe, Selene Y.F.; Perry, Amie; Hua, Kunjie; Pellizzon, Michael A.; Hansen, Kasper Daniel; Voy, Brynn H.; Bennett, Brian J.; Pomp, Daniel; Feinberg, Andrew P; Threadgill, David W.

In: Genetics, Vol. 208, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 399-417.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barrington, WT, Wulfridge, P, Wells, AE, Rojas, CM, Howe, SYF, Perry, A, Hua, K, Pellizzon, MA, Hansen, KD, Voy, BH, Bennett, BJ, Pomp, D, Feinberg, AP & Threadgill, DW 2018, 'Improving metabolic health through precision dietetics in mice', Genetics, vol. 208, no. 1, pp. 399-417. https://doi.org/10.1534/genetics.117.300536
Barrington WT, Wulfridge P, Wells AE, Rojas CM, Howe SYF, Perry A et al. Improving metabolic health through precision dietetics in mice. Genetics. 2018 Jan 1;208(1):399-417. https://doi.org/10.1534/genetics.117.300536
Barrington, William T. ; Wulfridge, Phillip ; Wells, Ann E. ; Rojas, Carolina Mantilla ; Howe, Selene Y.F. ; Perry, Amie ; Hua, Kunjie ; Pellizzon, Michael A. ; Hansen, Kasper Daniel ; Voy, Brynn H. ; Bennett, Brian J. ; Pomp, Daniel ; Feinberg, Andrew P ; Threadgill, David W. / Improving metabolic health through precision dietetics in mice. In: Genetics. 2018 ; Vol. 208, No. 1. pp. 399-417.
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