Improving inhaler adherence in a clinical trial through the use of the Nebulizer Chronolog

M. A. Nides, D. P. Tashkin, M. S. Simmons, Robert A Wise, V. C. Li, Cynthia S Rand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined whether utilizing an electronic medication monitor (Nebulizer Chronolog) to provide participants with detailed feedback on their metered-dose inhaler (ipratropium bromide or placebo) usage patterns would result in closer adherence to the prescribed regimen of two inhalations three times daily compared to a control group not receiving feedback. Adherence was also measured by canister weighing and self-report. Two-hundred fifty-one consecutive special intervention participants from the University of California, Los Angeles, and Johns Hopkins University centers of a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-sponsored clinical trial were enrolled in this ancillary study. Compared to controls, feedback participants at the 4- month follow-up adhered more closesly to the prescribed three sets per day (mean 1.95 vs 1.65) and used the prescribed two actuations in a greater percentage of sets (80 percent vs 60.3 percent). These results indicate that electronic monitoring of metered-dose inhaler use with a Nebulizer Chronolog in a clinical trial not only provides a more accurate assessment of adherence to prescribed inhaler use, but also enhances adherence when participants are given feedback of the monitoring results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)501-507
Number of pages7
JournalChest
Volume104
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Clinical Trials
Metered Dose Inhalers
Ipratropium
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.)
Los Angeles
Self Report
Inhalation
Placebos
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Nides, M. A., Tashkin, D. P., Simmons, M. S., Wise, R. A., Li, V. C., & Rand, C. S. (1993). Improving inhaler adherence in a clinical trial through the use of the Nebulizer Chronolog. Chest, 104(2), 501-507.

Improving inhaler adherence in a clinical trial through the use of the Nebulizer Chronolog. / Nides, M. A.; Tashkin, D. P.; Simmons, M. S.; Wise, Robert A; Li, V. C.; Rand, Cynthia S.

In: Chest, Vol. 104, No. 2, 1993, p. 501-507.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nides, MA, Tashkin, DP, Simmons, MS, Wise, RA, Li, VC & Rand, CS 1993, 'Improving inhaler adherence in a clinical trial through the use of the Nebulizer Chronolog', Chest, vol. 104, no. 2, pp. 501-507.
Nides, M. A. ; Tashkin, D. P. ; Simmons, M. S. ; Wise, Robert A ; Li, V. C. ; Rand, Cynthia S. / Improving inhaler adherence in a clinical trial through the use of the Nebulizer Chronolog. In: Chest. 1993 ; Vol. 104, No. 2. pp. 501-507.
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