Improving Health-related Quality of Life for Patients with Nonambulatory Cerebral Palsy: Who Stands to Gain from Scoliosis Surgery?

Daniel J. Miller, John M. Flynn, Saba Pasha, Burt Yaszay, Stefan Parent, Jahangir Asghar, Mark F. Abel, Joshua M. Pahys, Amer Samdani, Steven W. Hwang, Unni G. Narayanan, Paul D. Sponseller, Patrick J. Cahill

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction:It is unclear what factors influence health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in neuromuscular scoliosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate which factors are associated with an improvement in an HRQOL after spinal fusion surgery for nonambulatory patients with cerebral palsy (CP).Methods:A total of 157 patients with nonambulatory CP (Gross Motor Function Classification System IV and V) with a minimum of 2-year follow-up after PSF were identified from a prospective multicenter registry. Radiographs and quality of life were evaluated preoperatively and 2 years postoperatively. Quality of life was evaluated using the validated Caregiver Priorities and Child Health Index of Life with Disabilities (CPCHILD) questionnaire. Patients who had an increase of 10 points or greater from baseline CPCHILD scores were considered to have meaningful improvement at 2 years postoperatively. 10 points was chosen as a threshold for meaningful improvement based on differences between Gross Motor Function Classification System IV and V patients reported during the development of the CPCHILD. Perioperative demographic, clinical, and radiographic variables were analyzed to determine predicators for meaningful improvement by univariate and multivariate regression analysis.Results:A total of 36.3% (57/157) of the patients reported meaningful improvement in CPCHILD scores at 2 years postoperatively. Preoperative radiographic parameters, postoperative radiographic parameters, and deformity correction did not differ significantly between groups. Patients who experienced meaningful improvement from surgery had significantly lower preoperative total CHPILD scores (43.8 vs. 55.2, P<0.001). On backwards conditional binary logistic regression, only the preoperative comfort, emotions, and behavior domain of the CPCHILD was predictive of meaningful improvement after surgery (P≤0.001).Conclusion:Analysis of 157 CP patients revealed a meaningful improvement in an HRQOL in 36.3% of the patients. These patients tended to have lower preoperative HRQOL, suggesting more "room for improvement" from surgery. A lower score within the comfort, emotions, and behavior domain of the CPCHILD was predictive of meaningful improvement after surgery. Radiographic parameters of deformity or curve correction were not associated with meaningful improvement after surgery.Level of Evidence:Level II-retrospective review of prospectively collected data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E186-E192
JournalJournal of Pediatric Orthopaedics
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2020

Keywords

  • HRQOL
  • PSF
  • cerebral palsy
  • health-related quality of life
  • neuromuscular scoliosis
  • posterior spinal fusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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